Contrast/brightness adjustment question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Cagri, Dec 25, 2002.

  1. Cagri

    Cagri Second Unit

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    i have been reading the old threads for the last couple of hours and read in one of them someone quoting
     
  2. TimTurtino

    TimTurtino Stunt Coordinator

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    I believe that the warning is because, if you leave the contrast up, you'll be likely to adjust the brightness too high, and then if you leave it like that ("torch mode") for a long time, you'll create the problems associated with running at too high a contrast and brightness for extended periods of time.
    I have trouble imagining (without going into the service menu) a setting that you could briefly pass through which would cause long term damage to your TV; hence, not in the manual. [​IMG]
    Me
     
  3. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    This is complete bunk. You will need literally hundreds of hours of the set being on continuously with a static image to damage (burn-in) a set. There is nothing to worry about.
     
  4. Cagri

    Cagri Second Unit

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    Thanks
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Any television or monitor can be ruined by overdriving it. And it can happen in a surprisingly short time. Always reduce the contrast (and the white level/contrast is the one to be most concerned about) when setting up any new television. Burn-in is not your only concern; picture-tube life is as well.

    Never run a television at a 100-percent contrast setting.
     
  6. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    Jack is absolutely correct. "Torch Mode" from the factory can overdrive a tube or burn phosphors in a very short time. Not only are these settings available from the menu, they are very often the default settings! If you are serious about the life of your set (or Home Theater in general), get a copy of Avia or VE and turn down that contrast.

    The reason the manufacturers don't warn against this is:

    1) The dealers often utilize "torch mode" to make the set stand out under the bright flourescents.
    2) Overdriving causes gradual wear which decreases picture quality and the life of the tube(s). Not many warranty claims that state "gee, it just isn't as bright as it was 8 months ago" are going to be honored by a manufacturer.
     
  7. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Let me clarify. Having the settings high for a short period, such as durign calibration, will NOT damage your set. Even having it that way for a few days should not cause any burn-in, with normal use.

    Using your set with the factory settings, which are often incorrect and far too high for realistic viewing could damage your set over time, but it is still not all that likely, IMO. I know plenty of people who never calibrate their TVs, and while they are certainly missing out on improved image quality, their TVs have not failed nor have I noticed a meaningful degradation in picture quality on them.
     
  8. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Cagri,
    as stated, if you don't already have it, pick up a copy of AVIA Guide to Home Theater, it's the essential tool for the HT enthusiest.
    On this dvd you'll find all the tests you'll need to properly calibrate you monitor and sound system. It's pretty much impossible to properly adjust your monitor while viewing normal programming i.e. tv shows, movies, dvd's etc.
    AVIA has been a lifesaver for me! Before that I used to adjust my monitor by the naked eye and would spend sometimes HOURS going back and forth with material to see if it looks good. It wasn't until I got AVIA that I saw how off my estimation really was, and it only took MINUETS to adjust my monitor and I got better results as well!
    I've always said that when someone get's into this hobby they shold automatically be issued two things in the mail...
    1. A copy of AVIA.
    and...
    2. An SPL sound meter. [​IMG]
     
  9. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    My own suggestion for prolonging the life of the TV set:
    Get the AVIA DVD but, after finding out the limitations of the TV set using the brightness and contrast test patterns, back down the contrast significantly and re-do the rest of the calibrations around that.
    I have been suggesting contrast (sometimes called white level or picture) no more than halfway up for a direct view tube TV and no more than a third for a projection TV.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  10. Cagri

    Cagri Second Unit

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    John, I did my audio calibration using my receiver's test tones and an SPL meter some time ago, and I ordered not the AVIA but S&V HT tuneup disc. Can't wait to see the video calibration results, on the audio side I don't expect more than marginal improvements though....

    On the other hand; Jeff, I still think the manufacteres should put some warning in the manuals about the adjustment levels if they will damage the picture quality, not meaning I disagree they will. I mean they are even default settings set by themselves and they even tell you not to put non shielded speakers beside your TV... Strange...
     

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