Consensus on Polyurethane Glues?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Wayne Ernst, Jan 22, 2004.

  1. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Just checking in to see if some of you have tried the newer polyurethane glues when constructing your cabinets out of MDF? The polyurethane glue comes under the Elmer's name and also there are other products such as "Gorilla Glue" - as it's sold at Home Depot.

    I've used the Poly glue before when I was doing some other wood repairs. Not much glue is needed because it does expand a little as it "cures" so that the joints get properly filled.

    I intend to try it when I get into my sub project in the next week or so. I'll provide updates on my results. But, I do think this stuff looks promising. [​IMG]
     
  2. Ronnie Ferrell

    Ronnie Ferrell Second Unit

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Messages:
    355
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I used the stuff to build my A/V-1s. I've never used it again. That's because I had 1/2 a bottle left over and when I went to use it again a month or two later, the bottle was dried up. The stuff is WAY over priced to begin with and the very short shelf life doubled the cost for me.

    As long as you have good clean, tight fitting joints, Titebond is all you need with MDF.

    I can't wait to try the Titebond III that is coming out in a month or so. It is supposed to have a longer open time than TB-I and TB-II and also has a 1-year shelf life.

    Titebond III

    rf
     
  3. Wayne Ernst

    Wayne Ernst Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    2,588
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ronnie,

    Thanks for the follow-up. That Titebond III looks very promising.

    Now, I guess I should head out to my garage and see how my 2-month old bottle of Poly glue is holding up. I'll agree with you, though, it sure isn't too cheap - being $6.00 - $7.00 a bottle.
     
  4. KyleGS

    KyleGS Second Unit

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2002
    Messages:
    342
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Any of these glues sandable? I've been on a hunt for a sandable glue. Titebond II is NOT sandable and Liq. Nails is "marginally" sandable.
     
  5. TimForman

    TimForman Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2002
    Messages:
    847
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

    or any other wood. The only advantage is that it will expand and fill errors. Other than that it's a sloppy mess and I'll never buy it (Gorilla Glue) again. There must be a reason that the pros with decades of experience choose Titebond.
     
  6. Nick Hallett

    Nick Hallett Agent

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2003
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0


    just wait until the glue squeeze-out becomes "leather hard" and trim it off with a razor blade. a little tedious perhaps, but better than cleaning up the mess you can make with poly glues.
     
  7. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 1998
    Messages:
    2,573
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This speaker builder only uses Titebond and Elmer's carpenters glues. They are strong enough - joints stronger than the MDF. I keep a small bottle of poly around for the rare [​IMG] occasion when there's a small gap between two pieces of wood.
    Need I repeat my usual: you don't need screws or nails to add joint strength.[​IMG]
     
  8. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Producer

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 1999
    Messages:
    4,948
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I have more gaps than Hank, both in my reasoning as well as in my woodwork, so I find Gorilla Glue quite useful. [​IMG]
     
  9. Bob K

    Bob K Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2003
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I'm with Hank on this one. I use only good old yellow glue -- the joints are stronger than the MDF. I do use biscuits because they're wonderful for alignment, but although they add strength they're not necessary.

    Tempest Construction Pix: http://www.audiocircle.com/circles/m...view_album.php
     
  10. MattD

    MattD Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 29, 2000
    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Use Tightbond
     
  11. Denis P

    Denis P Extra

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2003
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Polyurethane foams and expands but the foam does nothing to add strength to an imperfect joint. The only glue you can really use to fill a gap is epoxy. Polyurethane glue is great for outside work where you need waterproof glue. Ordinary carpenter's glue is not waterproof. Poly is also good if you have to glue wood that is very moist, for example exterior treated lumber. Poly glue actually needs moisture on the surface to work. As long as you are not building super-duper-work-outside-in-a-hurricane speakers, yellow glue is more than adequate. Note: if you are building hurricane speakers with Gorilla glue, don't use MDF[​IMG] .
     

Share This Page