cons of Pan & Scan - for an article...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JasonKrol, Jan 15, 2002.

  1. JasonKrol

    JasonKrol Supporting Actor

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    Hello all,

    Please, I know the cons of Pan & Scan, but I would like you all to provide me with some strong points on why Pan & Scan is bad. I am writing an article to help education the J6P on why Pan & Scan is bad (specifically Pan & Scan, I am also working on another article on why OAR is good. But im leaving them as 2 articles linking to each other. Feel free to list Pros and Cons of each)

    Any information is greatly appreciated!!!

    Thanks again!!
     
  2. Andrew_Sch

    Andrew_Sch Cinematographer

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    You often end up with hands, noses, guns, etc. talking to each other when characters are on opposite edges of the screen, or you don't see the reactions of the character who's listening if they choose to pan to the speaker. Just a question, what are you writing this article for?
     
  3. JasonKrol

    JasonKrol Supporting Actor

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    im working on a HT website geared initially towards the newbie (j6p i guess). Im basically trying to make it a comprehensive resource for all things HT related.
     
  4. Travis D

    Travis D Second Unit

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    During nude scenes, boobies may be cut off.

    Hey, that'll for work the J6P college boy, trust me.
     
  5. CamiloCamacho

    CamiloCamacho Stunt Coordinator

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    Soon your TV will have those damn black bars on the sides
    (16:9 is the future, not them)[​IMG]
     
  6. Nate Anderson

    Nate Anderson Screenwriter

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    Loss of picture on the sides can make a wonderful shot into an awful one, not to mention by zooming in, you're drastically losing resolution, and since a person gets into DVD for better picture, this would be going backwards!
     
  7. Adam_S

    Adam_S Producer

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    You're losing up to half the picture.

    Pan and scan lowers the resolution, which means the picture doesn't look as good, and much more like vhs.

    NTSC standard is going out 16:9 is coming soon

    it can ruin the artistic quality of the shot.

    supporting it suggests an ignorance towards art and good taste

    the camera whipping back and forth (as in Jaws) is very unpleasing to the eye

    entire people are often cut off (ask someone if he were an extra in starwars would he be upset if he was completely cut out of the film so the screen could be all filled up good).

    pan and scan transfers take up good dvd extras space or cover art space

    pan and scan films will not be widescreen on widescreen tvs, you'd have to zoom it so that you're only seeing about a 6th of the original picture if you don't want bars on the side, and that really is extremely ugly to anyone.
     
  8. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    The common fallacy has returned, that Pan-and-Scan means cropping widescreen movies for TV proportions.

    Pan-and-Scan also applies to older movies, and TV shows, which are filmed in the 4:3 aspect ration (watch Disney's "Snow White". It's TV-shaped 'cause it's supposed to be, not because it got P&Sed).

    When Widescreen TVs become the norm, and older 4:3 material would nominally be displayed with black bars on the sides, there is the concern that they will be Pan-and-Scanned, by zooming in and cropping the top and bottom.

    Likewise, there are numerous reports of 2.35:1 movies being cropped to a 1.85:1 aspect ration (for widescreen presentation).

    Thus, Pan-and-Scan can affect any source, of any aspect ratio, if it doesn't match the aspect ratio of the intended display device.
     
  9. Bjorn Olav Nyberg

    Bjorn Olav Nyberg Supporting Actor

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  10. HenrikTull

    HenrikTull Second Unit

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    Bjørn, Super35 in 1975? Don't think so... [​IMG]
     
  11. Bjorn Olav Nyberg

    Bjorn Olav Nyberg Supporting Actor

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    That was not what I said
    A quick look at the technical details on IMDB say it was filmed anamorphic anyway, thus it was panned & scanned for 4:3.
    http://uk.imdb.com/Technical?0073195
     
  12. Aaron Ulmer

    Aaron Ulmer Agent

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    While watching the supplemental features the The Mummy Returns, I noticed something that really shows the difference. I rented this in pan & scan (couldn't find widescreen anywhere), so I'm not sure the widescreen version show this.
    Under the supplemental features, there is a segment that shows special effects at various stages of production. Check out the first scene where the mummy first sees his resurrected mistress. There are four sequences, shown in widescreen, detailing how much work it took to get their eyes to follow each other.
    The final cut is shown in pan & scan, and you completely lose the entire effect. While in widescreen, you can watch her eyes follow the mummy. In the pan & scan version, she off the screen for most of the scene.
    It's amazing what you notice when you watch a scene in widescreen four times and then switch to pan & scan. You almost immediately notice that it has a very different look and feel than the original. I actually thought it was a different scene at first.
     
  13. cafink

    cafink Producer

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  14. Kimmo Jaskari

    Kimmo Jaskari Screenwriter

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    For movies that have actually been panned & scanned, the drawbacks are usually quite large. First of all, if the aspect ratio started out at 2.35:1, you'll find that some 40% of the image area has been excised. Losing that much of the original image is, IMHO, a bad thing in and of itself.
    From that of course follows that the composition of the scene has also gone almost completely out the window. A wide shot, having two people at opposite ends of the screen, becomes a shot of just one person, to pick one of the more dramatic examples. A group shot of people gathered around a large table becomes a shot of less than half of the table - and people - etc.
    If you want inspiration and direct side by side comparisons, all you need to do is look at the examples page at widescreen.org, over at http://www.widescreen.org/examples.shtml - it really does speak for itself.
     
  15. Ken_McAlinden

    Ken_McAlinden Producer
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    Whether you pan & scan or matte open, you are altering carefully planned image compositions. If you were going to show the Mona Lisa on a 4:3 display, would you choose to show the smile with the top of the hands, the hands without the top of the face? Would you show it with black bars on either side? If so, would you feel obligated to paint in extra landscape on either side so the screen is full? Of course not! If Leonardo Da Vinci wants to do this, I'll accept it, but not from anyone else.

    Regards,
     

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