Connection ?s

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Edward___M, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. Edward___M

    Edward___M Auditioning

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have Dishnetwork DVR with optical audio out, s-video out (no component video out), RCA video output; Sony DVD with optical audio out, s-video and component video out; Yamaha YHT-160 HTIB receiver has 2 optical audio inputs, no s-video inputs/outputs, and 2 component video inputs, 1 component video output; Panasonic TV has one s-video input, one component video input, two RCA video inputs. I'm pretty clear on utilizing the optical audio for satellite and DVD, but wonder if i should bypass the receiver for s-video connections (but TV only has one s-video input (does have another s-video input under front flap door, which I dont want to use permanently, I dont think). Any advice would be appreciated.
    PS is there a universal remote which controls Dishnetwork along with other components?
     
  2. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 1999
    Messages:
    6,873
    Likes Received:
    2
    How critical are you abotu your picture quality? In my bedroom I've got a similar system, but my old NTSC TV only has one S-Video input. I just ditched it and use composite video for everything including 480i from an HDTV box, Dish Network, and DVD. Sure I'm losing a little quality by not using S-Video but think I care? No. The difference is small on a TV like mine. If you can run S-video directly to the TV and not have it be too much of a pain in the butt to use, that would give you a better picture. How much better depends largely on your TV.

    As for remotes, I use a one for all remote in both my main theater and in my bedroom and they work great for Dish Network boxes.
     
  3. Charlie Campisi

    Charlie Campisi Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    1,620
    Likes Received:
    43
    Welcome to the forum!

    There is no need to run the video through the receiver unless you need the switching or want to upconvert. I'd use the best connections you have -- S-video for the dvr and component for the DVD. Use the optical audio connections to the receiver for your audio. You can simultaneously run the rca audio to the tv if you ever want to watch it with your receiver off.

    I believe the Harmony remotes will run the dish boxes. As long as they are IR based and not RF. You can go on the harmonyremote.com website to check. I don't have experience with other universals, but I love my two harmonys. Easy to set up and the wife, babysitter, 6 y.o. kid can all run my systems. One button "watch tv" sets all the correct inputs and powers on the correct devices. If you look at harmony, consider the 676, 680 or 880 for dvr use. I have a 659, which is ok, but for dvr, I prefer the button layout of the others.
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    5,182
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am using a Harmony 688 and it very nicely handles the DishNetwork PVR, the HD CATV PVR and even my Samsung TV (which other remotes dont properly handle the volume control).

    I do strongly recommend you switch to SVideo for the DVD player.

    Home Theater magazine compared all 3 connection types on a 50" reference TV with the same DVD player. They concluded:

    - Composite connection : baseline
    - SVideo : 20% improvement in picture over Composite
    - Component : 25% improvement over Composite

    They also noted the difference was less if the TV was smaller, and greater if the TV was larger.

    Back in the day, I would keep both Composite and SVideo hooked up and toggle between the two to show friends the difference. It was quite visible.

    I tried the same A/B test on the Dish box, and did not see as much obvious improvement on most channels. This was because many of the channels were compressed or were so-so quality to start with.

    But the difference in a DVD is usually obvious.
     
  5. Edward___M

    Edward___M Auditioning

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2006
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    More connection ?s (my receiver: Yamaha HTR-5830, Google search, wont let me post its link):

    1. What should I use for DVD audio: optical output or six channel outputs? My DVD player can play SACDs which I believe are optimized for the six channel output, but I don't think I have any SACDs, just regular CDs and I'd like to use the AV receiver's DSP program options.

    2. Is there any sense in connecting the DVD component video through the receiver (and then a second component video cable from the receiver to the TV), instead of directly from the DVD to the TV. My Dish network DVR does not have component video output, and will be connected directly to the TV via S-video input.

    3. Is there a noticeable improvement in audio or video with the "gold plated" cables. I'd rather use the non-gold cables I already have unless someone convinces me to opt for the gold cables.

    4. My basement renovation contractor recommends I return my 16 gauge stereo wire for something thinner which will allow it to be more easily snaked through the wall mount. The thicker wire will evidently not fit through a small hole immediately next to the screw which mounts the front and surround speakers to the wall.
     
  6. Dick Knisely

    Dick Knisely Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    372
    Likes Received:
    0

    Unless the run is a very long one, 16g is more than absolutely necessary but not usually heavy. I'm surprised it is giving him a problem. If the contractor isn't an AV specialist then I'd first verify the situation carefully. If need be drop down the wire down but I'd be real sure there wasn't some way to make the hole larger or otherwise make it work.
     
  7. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    5,182
    Likes Received:
    0

    The guy knows nothing about audio systems. He is trying to make his life easier by having you mess up the wires.

    A speaker website once recommended the following gauge of wires based on run-length:

    1-10 ft: 16 ga
    11-20 ft: 14 ga
    20+ ft: 12 ga

    So you need thicker wire for the longer in-wall runs.

    While you CAN get away with 16 or 14 ga for a HT system - you mentioned SACD audio. For an Audio system - you do not want the high-frequency roll-off caused by thin speaker wire over long runs.

    There is 1 exception: does your basement contractor suggest 4-conductor 16 ga wire? Many high-end installs actually use this. They twist 2 of the wires together for the "+" side and the other 2 wires for the "-" side. This means 4 wires to each speaker.

    Another point: make sure to use speaker wire with fire-proof insulation. It is called in-wall rated or CL3. Many fire codes require this if you run wires in the walls.
     

Share This Page