Connecting RF Wireless Nodes to Wired Hub?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by John Morris, Jan 30, 2002.

  1. John Morris

    John Morris Guest

    I have a housewide wired 10/100 network which is connected to a cable modem via a hub through a hard firewall. I would like to be able to use my notebook in the back yard via a wireless network connection. Can I simply plug a wireless transceiver into my hub and a wireless transceiver into my notebook's PCMCIA slot and go from there? Can you integrate wireless nodes into a wired network? If so, what wireless gear would you recommend for my situation? Finally, if this works, I'd like to do the same thing for my new HTPC, rather than run some cable. What would you suggest?

    Thanks for your help!
     
  2. Glenn

    Glenn Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi John,
    It is very easy to add wireless capability to your wired home network. All you need is an Wireless Access Point and the wireless PCMCIA card as you mentioned. The Access Point is hooked into your network via Cat 5 cable from your hub. There some software involved for the access point and the wireless card but they are pretty simple to setup. You would be able to add your HTPC to the wireless network as well.
    There are many different brands of wireless units. Here is a web site that is great for information and reviews of networking details and hardware.
    http://practicallynetworked.com/index.htm
    Watch for deals locally and on the web for wireless products, prices have fallen over the past few months.
    Good luck,
    Glenn
     
  3. John Morris

    John Morris Guest

    Glen: thank you very much for the info and the headstart. After reading your suggestions, and doing some research on wireless and reviews, I think I'm gonna replace my switch/hub with a new D-Link DI-714 which accepts or replaces my current hard wired nodes, cable modem firewall, and adds a wireless AP. This unit also allows me to connect my old USR modem via RS-232 connection as a backup connection to the internet. Finally, it includes a built in NAT firewall and uses stateful packet inspection too. To this all I need to add is a single USB Wireless adapter which I can use on either my notebook or HTPC as the need arises. Total Cost is under $300.

    Does this plan sound like a good plan?
     
  4. Hugh M

    Hugh M Second Unit

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    hey, at least this thread gave you understandable answers. the other one I saw you post was funny because I couldn't understand a word of it.... won't say where I saw that other thread. [​IMG]
    I'm going to be doing just this because I plan on getting one of the pen tablet computers and then I will need to connect that to my firewall, and my HTPC. I thank you for beating me to the task!
    now if I can just figure out all those abbreviations. the AP took me a while. WLAN a little less.
     
  5. Glenn

    Glenn Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi John,

    I am not familiar with that model but I would read the reviews on the practically networked web site and go from there on picking models. I read the reviews from users as well as the ones from the web site staff.

    Depending on how you look at it one unit replacing two or three can be good, or it can be bad. I have a seperate Wireless Access Point but that is only because when I was buying mine that was all that was available. Now they have the super duper do-it all units that can replace router, hub, and access point. Some even have a print servers built-in. I am now using the D-Link DWL-1000AP and I have been very happy with it.

    Whatever you decide to buy check around for prices because there are some great deals out there on networking items. The D-Link DI-714 looks like it shoudl meet your needs if you want to replace existing components.

    I have not use any of the Wireless USB adapters but I guess they work well too. I use the PCMCIA card for my laptop.

    Adding the wireless network has been one of THE best things ever for me and my wife in our house. She and I both have laptops and it is very nice to be able to have internet/network access anywhere in out house and outside on the back deck.

    Glenn

    >>After reading your suggestions, and doing some research on wireless and reviews, I think I'm gonna replace my switch/hub with a new D-Link DI-714 which accepts or replaces my current hard wired nodes, cable modem firewall, and adds a wireless AP. This unit also allows me to connect my old USR modem via RS-232 connection as a backup connection to the internet. Finally, it includes a built in NAT firewall and uses stateful packet inspection too. To this all I need to add is a single USB Wireless adapter which I can use on either my notebook or HTPC as the need arises. Total Cost is under $300.

    Does this plan sound like a good plan?
     
  6. Brian Hepler

    Brian Hepler Stunt Coordinator

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    John,

    I've heard good things about D-Link's wireless products. A friend of mine at the office got a good deal getting his and he loves it. A bit quirky at times, but the quirks appear to be display-only (the underlying function works, even if the computer displays "poor connection", that sort of thing).

    I've had a wireless ethernet in my house for about eight months now. One of the best purchases I've made yet.

    My only useful bit of advice is to avoid LinkSys's line of wireless products. I got burned at the beginning of my quest and switched to another brand (SMC and Orinoco).

    PracticallyNetworked really is the place to go for this sort of information. Including directions on how to set up your WLAN when you get the equipment in the mail!

    Brian
     
  7. Glenn

    Glenn Stunt Coordinator

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    Hi John,

    I forgot to mention one thing. Having that modem backup option is pretty neat but once I got DSL a modem speed just doesn't cut it. Luckily my DSL has been pretty reliable. That modem backup would be a very important option if your high-speed access is not reliable. That was a feature early on in a couple of Wireless products, then it seemed to disappear. I guess it is coming back in some products.

    Glenn

    >>This unit also allows me to connect my old USR modem via RS-232 connection as a backup connection to the internet.
     

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