confusion about receivers

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by EricDeB, Sep 5, 2004.

  1. EricDeB

    EricDeB Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok I assumed that if a receiver has 3 composite inputs, 3 s-video inputs, and 2 component inputs then you can use all of them, but a friend told me that you only have a few inputs. Is that true? Even if I have all those choices can I only use a few of them.
     
  2. FeisalK

    FeisalK Screenwriter

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    you might have just 3 video inputs with 2 or 3 options for each, i.e. video1 you can use composite, s-video or component, video2 you have composite, s-video and component, and video3 you have composite and s-video

    not sure if you can connect say for example a DVD player and a Xbox to the same input (video1) using the component for dvd and s-video for xbox without running the risk of damaging the equipment if you happen to have both switched on at the same time
     
  3. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    Somehow, I don't think your post came out right, and you've got your inputs mixed up with your outputs, but no matter.

    The idea is to plug everything that you have into your receiver, and then use your receiver to choose what you want to go to your TV.

    LIke you might have an X-Box, and a VCR. You'd have two sets of composite cables going into the receiver, but only one cable (the yellow) going OUT to your TV.

    You can also have (if your TV has enough sockets on it) a composite signal, an S-Video signal and a component signal all going to your TV, and you pick which one you want to use on your receiver, and then select the right video input on your TV. The more expensive the receiver, the more sockets it will have, so don't buy one that you will fill up, unless the receiver is the last pice you are buying, and you'll never buy anything else! [​IMG]

    Glenn
     
  4. John S

    John S Producer

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    What make and model AVR?
     
  5. EricDeB

    EricDeB Stunt Coordinator

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    Thank you very much FeisalK I really appreciate how you worded that. I was having trouble doing so.

    "you might have just 3 video inputs with 2 or 3 options for each, i.e. video1 you can use composite, s-video or component, video2 you have composite, s-video and component, and video3 you have composite and s-video."

    Thank you very much FeisalK. My question is how do I know, before buying a receiver that it only has so many options? How do they word that in the specs? Also, can you have 3 different things all plugged into video 1, as long as they aren't all playing at the same time?

    Thank you guys I worded that terribly
     
  6. FeisalK

    FeisalK Screenwriter

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    Eric

    most specs will say x AV inputs and y component inputs but take a look @ the back of the receiver. This probably means you have x video inputs in total and y of those have component options.

    For example, on the Yamaha website the specs for the RX-V750 will say that there are 5 video inputs and 2 component ins, and the image of the back shows 2 component ins labeled for the first two video inputs.
     
  7. EricDeB

    EricDeB Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok but even if I have only have one component output and two component inputs I can have two things hooked up to the inputs and switch between them using the receiver. Can I do that for my other video inputs too, like S-video and regular inputs??
     
  8. FeisalK

    FeisalK Screenwriter

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    yep. thats what video switching on the receiver is. Mind you it depends on the receiver and if your display has enough inputs sometimes it might be better to hook up directly
     
  9. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Normally you should connect only as many things as there are sets of audio jacks, for example if one A/V receiver input bank has left, right, composite, and S-video, only one thing should be connected there. If the next bank has left, right, composite, S-video, Y, Pb, and Pr, only one thing should be connected there.

    There are a few instances when you can take advantage of doubling up on a bank, for example some digital cable boxes have both composite and S-video (or both composite and component). Analog channels sometimes look better using a composite connection, notably if your TV has a good comb filter. So you might connect red, yellow, green, and blue video as well as the red and white audio connections from the same cable box all to the same receiver bank that has both composite and component. (Select composite or component at the TV in this example)

    You could connect the DVD player (via component) and the VCR (via composite) to the same bank but managing the audio becomes confusing. You have to use a switch box to access the single set of audio jacks in that bank. Also remembering that the same selector knob position on the front of the receiver is both DVD and VCR is confusing. Probably more trouble than it is worth.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  10. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    just look at the front of the receiver. there will be one of two ways you can see how many inputs it can handle.

    1. there will be a row (or series) of buttons. they will be labeled; video 1, video2, cd, dvd, etc.

    2. there will be some knob you turn. the display will show you which input you're selecting.

    in either case, just count the number of inputs you're going through ... that's how many you have available.
     

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