Concrete basement floor. What to do?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jason GT, Feb 4, 2003.

  1. Jason GT

    Jason GT Second Unit

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    I just got a fairly nasty sub (woohoo!). However, I'm in a basement with a concrete floor, carpeted in the HT area.

    Unfortunately, whenever I turn up the volume, the upper floor shakes more than a bit, while the response in my HT is much more ... restrained.

    Does anybody have suggestions for improving bass response (maybe so that if the upper floor has to shake, that I at least get some of the oomph in my chest?)

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Rick_Brown

    Rick_Brown Second Unit

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    Is the ceiling drywalled? If so, add another layer of 5/8" drywall.
     
  3. Dave Ma

    Dave Ma Stunt Coordinator

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    I have the same problem! You are screwed, bass travels thats just the way it is. No matter what you do the bass will travel.
     
  4. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    I have moved my HT from the main floor of my old house (wood floor) to the basement (concrete floor) and now to the split-level floor of the new house (wood floor). The first thing I noticed when I did the latest move was the increase in bass that is felt. The fact that the floors are wood makes a big difference because it shakes the floor and acts like a bass shaker unit. If you are willing to, one possible answer is a sub floor (plywood over wood frame).
     
  5. Rich Malloy

    Rich Malloy Producer

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    Can you install one of those... oh, what are they called?... "floating floors", or something? You know, a wooden flooring built on beams. I think there was a brief "Home Theater Architect" piece on this in the January issue of Stereophile-Guide to Home Theater.
     
  6. Rick_Brown

    Rick_Brown Second Unit

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    Dave said: "I have the same problem! You are screwed, bass travels thats just the way it is. No matter what you do the bass will travel."

    It is true that bass is really hard to contain, but having now plowed my way through about a year's worth of threads in the "HT Construction and Interiors" section, it appears that it is indeed possible with a lot of work. The main advice seems to be that to truly contain bass within the room you need to build a "room-within-a-room" that does not connect at all to the existing walls and ceilings. Combine that with some special insulation and caulking methods, treatment of mechanical systems and more and it can be done.
     
  7. Cam S

    Cam S Screenwriter

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    I have the same kind of flooring where my sub is in the basement of my house. I have a hanging tile ceiling, and a wood floor in the level above the basement. I get no rattling at all with my Shiva sub, which is great. I can't say glasses (in the bar), paintings, light fixtures etc etc don't rattle, but it's all good [​IMG]

    I don't really think there is an easy way of fixing this problem short of moving the theater, or installing a new roof or floor.
     
  8. James Edward

    James Edward Supporting Actor

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    I am also in your situation. I go to friend's homes with suspended wood floors, and they have significantly more of a tactile feel to their system. My only solution, short of major construction, was to 'overwoof' my room.

    It is only 12x12, but I use an SVS PC Plus sub, which flaps my pants and and parts my hair, but does not make the couch shake. It is not the sub's fault, but my concrete slab. The vibrations just don't travel as well as with wood. I brought it to a friend's house and could not believe it was the same sub.

    Unless you're willing to reconstruct your basement, go for the biggest, baddest sub you can afford. A cement floor is a bummer for HT. I would imagine it's quite nice for music, though...
     
  9. Jason GT

    Jason GT Second Unit

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    Thanks for the feedback, guys.
     
  10. Joe Cole

    Joe Cole Second Unit

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    How about a wooden riser for the seating area? Would that help with getting the vibration effects lost because of the slab?

    I am thinking of moving my HT to my basement with a concrete slab but don't want to build a false floor.

    I have three subs, 2 SVS 16-46 CS+ subs and one THX 18" Velodyne. I am sure this is enough woofer power but I would miss the chair vibrations when things blow up crash etc....
     
  11. Cam S

    Cam S Screenwriter

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    Geez, my Shiva is on a concrete floor and it was actually louder on that floor than at my friends house with a wood floor, I couldn't believe it. Her room was alot smaller too, maybe 12'x12', with mine being 14'x23'. Mucts be the shape of the room or something?
     

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