Concerned about bass problem on denon 2900. 2200 better option?

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by Todd smith, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

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    I have been reading numerous reviews about the 10db bass loss on the denon dvd-2900. I also noticed they corrected this with the release of the 2200 with a 10db bass boost. Can someone explain exactly what this problem is? Would this make the 2200 a better option? Would my H/K 525 be able to counteract the -10db problem with the 2900 or should I go for the 2200?

    I was all set to get the 2900, but reading this consistent complaint has caused me to reconsider. Help clear up this confusion for me if you guys could.
     
  2. Chuck Kent

    Chuck Kent Supporting Actor

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    I didn't realize that the 2900 didn't have the boost available.

    As long as you can adjust your receiver's multi-channel analog input volume levels (incl. the sub's), then you should be fine. To my knowledge, the 525 should be able to do so. As an alternative, and while it would reduce the overall playback level, you could also turn down the other 5 channels on the 2900 to match the sub's level.

    It's worth pointing out that Denon warns 2200 owners in the manual that the +10 setting on the sub output could cause input overload in some cases. Since it's analog, the chances would likely be rare but it could happen.

    For me (a 2200 owner), I am fortunate in that my 3803 Denon receiver has a sub volume boost option available for the multi-channel analog inputs. I think some others are beginning to offer that as an option too.
     
  3. Stephen M

    Stephen M Stunt Coordinator

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    The original post is incorrect. The 2900 has the same bass boost option as revealed in the white paper for the 2900 on the Denon site.
     
  4. Jeffrey R

    Jeffrey R Stunt Coordinator

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    Stephen:

    I think you are mistaking the bass boost for 2-channel analog cd output (which both the 2200 and 2900 have) from the 10db bass boost that the 2200 has (and the 2900 does not) for the multichannel output. The first post is correct in that regard.

    The usual solution on the 2900 is to either adjust the levels in your receiver to boost the sub output, or to lower the other 5 channels in the 2900 setup to counteract the low bass for SACD and DVD-A.
     
  5. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

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    so I should be fine if I get the 2900 with my 525?
     
  6. Jeffrey R

    Jeffrey R Stunt Coordinator

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    You should be able to get your system properly calibrated with that setup.

    Like I said, first, you could just lower the other 5 channels in the Denon setup to your liking (theoretically, 10db). Or, if your 525 is like my 520, you should be able to adjust the level of the multichannel inputs directly in the 525.

    I don't know if the 520 was ahead of its time, but I can definitely adjust the db level of the 6 channels directly in the 6-channel analog inputs. There's still no bass management like the 525 has, but the channels can be adjusted individually. So, you should have 2 options to tweak the outputs to your liking.

    Frankly, the omission of the 10db bass boost in the 2900 is more a nuisance than a real detraction. I like being able to just set the 10db bass boost in my 2200, but it wouldn't have stopped me from buying a 2900 if I was willing to shell out the extra $$.
     
  7. Stephen M

    Stephen M Stunt Coordinator

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    Jeff; Thanks for the correction. I guess I should read those tech papers a little closer [​IMG]
     

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