Components of top of 65" Mits

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Rick Wilson, Aug 9, 2002.

  1. Rick Wilson

    Rick Wilson Stunt Coordinator

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    My new 65909 will be delivered next week. Due to the layout of my greatroom, it will have to go diagonally across a corner of the room. There is a window and door on the left side and fireplace on the right. Therefore, my components (A/V receiver, VCR, DVD, DirecTV box, and center channel speaker) will have to go on top. I would like to help spread out some of the weight. I have 3 ideas so far:
    1. a 3/8 inch piece of glass laid on that spongy shelf liner and would hopefully disperse the weight evenly across the top of the set.
    2. a 1/2 inch sheet of birch plywood with a 1X2 strip all around the edge (would be under the plywood and raise the plywood 1 inch - ie. 2 inch footprint). This would be laminated in a complimentary laminate (wife factor). This would distribute the weight around the edges of the top.
    3. Laminate a 1/2 inch or 3/4 inch board and lay it on top without any feet.
    Which of these would be better? Is there another possibility? I can not use a component stand.

    Thanks

    Which idea would be best
     
  2. Rich Kraus

    Rich Kraus Stunt Coordinator

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    i have a 46 mits 05 series. i have an adire kit81 on top of the set. i noticed today when i was adjusting the convergence that there is a slight bow to the top. the bow goes away when the speaker is removed (whew). im going to add a piece of 1/2 ply, with a thin spacer over the right and left side, to put the weight over the upright frames of the set.

    good luck
     
  3. Jeff Rosz

    Jeff Rosz Second Unit

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    hi
    i use a plate of glass that reaches all the way out to the left and right edges on top of my 55807 , no sagging. but all i have is a center channel. if i had to put a heavy amp up there, i think i would build a shelf about an inch above the top with legs to the floor. if its just a dvd or vcr or light stuff like that then i wouldnt worry bout it.
     
  4. Bryan Michael

    Bryan Michael Supporting Actor

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    if you want to use glass and your amp is heav i would go tempered glass and or you can buld a flexi rack that encloses the tv i have seen some then you can male shelves for each side to put your speakers on o have the mit ws-65819 and have the polk audio 400i on top of it that is a heavy speaker
     
  5. Pete Jennings

    Pete Jennings Second Unit

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    Been there, done that. [​IMG] I originally bought a 55" Mits, and had a 3/8" sheet of untempered glass cut for the top of it to support my B&W LCR6 center channel speaker (30lbs). It supported the weight fine, with no bowing for 30 days. I then decided my room size was sufficient for the larger 65" Mits, so I traded up. I had to buy another piece of 3/8" untempered glass for the 65" Mits, and all was fine for about a day. [​IMG] The glass started bowing badly in the middle, and the back coners bowed up. I had to take my LCR6 off of it and put it on a wall mounted TV stand. I am happy with this arrangement, but it wouldn't work in your circumstances. Apparently the difference in length between the two size RPTV's exceeds the ability of the 3/8" glass to support any real weight.
    I would recommend you go with your second idea to build a "cap" for the top of the RPTV, but I would suggest you use a 1" thick piece of birch or plywood in stead of the 1/2". Don't use the 1X2 strips across the front, it will probably bow the TV, and then you will be back to square one. The cap will probably bow slightly, but as long as it doesn't touch the top of the Mits you will be ok. I have seen pictures of people doing what you are suggesting, and it really looks nice.[​IMG]
    The funny thing about my situation was that I left the glass on top, because my wife and I liked the look of it. When I later added a bias backlight, the glass acts kind of like a wick, and the front edge glows a REALLY cool shade of green! I gave my uncle my old sheet of glass for his 55" Mits and after he added a bias light he called me to tell me how neat the green glow was. I guess I squeezed the lemons hard enough to make lemonade!
    Best of luck to you, enjoy your new Mits!!!
    Pete
     
  6. Rick Wilson

    Rick Wilson Stunt Coordinator

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    Pete,
    So, if I understand correctly, you think I should only have the 1X2 strips on the end as "feet". Do you think the edges would hold about 75 pounds (all of my equipment)?
     
  7. Pete Jennings

    Pete Jennings Second Unit

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    Ouch! That's quite a bit of weight. I am not a structural engineer, but I think you could use strips along both sides, and then across the back to distribute the weight as evenly as possible. Put the heaviest components towards the sides. You don't want *anything* touching the front center of the RPTV, or the lens frame.
    The only other thing I know you can do is go with a wire rack. Superior Shelving has 60" wide shelving units that would probably do the job, and will certianly support the weight. I am not sure about the costs though.
    Good luck.
    Pete
     
  8. Bryan Michael

    Bryan Michael Supporting Actor

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    buld a shelf and use brackets to hold it up you can put 2 large shelf brackets in the edges of thetv where it is near the wall and run a shelf from bracket to bracket put some stifining around the ediges and atach to brackets i used these 1000lb brackets and i sank them behind the drywall in the studs
     
  9. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

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    To guarantee that there's no issues, the top 'hat' needs to be able to support all the weight while only being supported at the four corners where the TV's casing is the most rigid.

    My Toshiba measures 59.5" across, and one side easily supports a 100+lb amp, so a 200+lb shelf plus equipment shouldn't be a problem, so #2 works for me. A tophat out of 3/4" plywood with some 2x2 (or strips of plywood on edge)diagonal bracing underneath and 1x3 sides to box it off, with some of those small/square velcro pads to attach it to the TV top ought to be able to handle some serious weight. If you're real paranoid, make the shelf out of 2x8s, or whatever width is needed to get the desired depth.

    GM
     
  10. harvey_mason

    harvey_mason Agent

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    I also have a 65 inch mits ws65611. I have a psb c6i on top of the tv, (speaker weighs 30 lbs exactly) but after reading these posts I think it is best to remove it and come up w/ something else.
    I have no shelve building skills so I amnot sure what I can do at this point.

    Maybe tempered glass?? OR maybe just removing the speaker when not in use??

    any suggestions??

    regards,
    Harvey
     
  11. Jeff Rosz

    Jeff Rosz Second Unit

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    harvey,
    i saw at a different forum where someone used one of those swingarm type computer monitor holders to hold his CC. and now i cant find the pic of it either.
     
  12. Jeff Rosz

    Jeff Rosz Second Unit

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    ok i found it.
    it turns out it was a wall mount for a tv.
    heres a pic
     
  13. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

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    Tempered glass should work just fine, though I would use those little hemispherical clear 'bumpers' to isolate/stabilize/support it in the corners, with a few around the perimeter.

    The wall mount TV bkt. looks like a better solution though for when you need to move the RPTV around, but may not have as high a SAF.

    GM
     

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