Components heating up...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Richard_E, Apr 4, 2002.

  1. Richard_E

    Richard_E Agent

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    Should I be concerned about the temperature in my home theater cabinet? I am following the suggestions for the receiver and sat receivers about not stacking components on top of them. But even with a fair amount of space between shelves, it seems pretty hot in there after several hours of use.

    Do people use fans for circulation? Other solutions?

    I have a receiver, a DirecTivo unit, a HD Sat receiver, and a DVD player in the cabinet, separated by 3 shelves (the DirecTivo is on top of the DVD player)

    Thanks in advance for helping a newbie.

    -Richard
     
  2. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    If this in a cabinet with closed doors, you could have an issue (depending on equipment). I would stick a thermometer in there and get a temperature reading. If it is over the manufacturer's spec, I'd figure out a way to get cool air in the cabinet (PC fans, larger opening in the back, etc.).
     
  3. Jeff Pryor

    Jeff Pryor Supporting Actor

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    My receiver will get the hottest of my equipment (besides the DVD player, but it gets used less), so I sometimes set a small desktop fan nearby. Works great.
     
  4. Glenn Overholt

    Glenn Overholt Producer

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    Is it hot enough to fry an egg on? [​IMG]
    Sorry, I just had to ask. There should be 6 to 8" of space above your receiver, but fans can really help.
    If you have an AC socket on the back of your receiver, you can either buy a 110vac fan or use an AC-DC converter with a 12volt dc fan (like they have in PC's). My AC/DC adapter is on 9 volts. The fan runs slower this way, but it is quieter too. Remember to have the fan set so that it will blow the heat away from the receiver, and with a few screws and small brackets, you could mount it to something.
    Glenn
     
  5. Matt Harwood

    Matt Harwood Agent

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    When I did my built-in equipment rack above the TV alcove (I'll have photos shortly), I bought 2 120VAC fans (model number 108X120VS3ST) with standard socket plugs from acton-electronics.com (http://www.action-electronics.com/fans.htm). They're 4.5" in diameter and cost about $13.00 each. I bored a 4.5" hole above the receiver, and one in the back behind the CD changer and DVD player. I connected both fan plugs to an extension cord, and plugged the extension cord into the switched outlet on the back of the receiver. Whenever the receiver is on, the fans are running. They move 57 cfm (according to the specs), are very quiet (34 db @ 1700 RPM), and I can definitely feel a difference in the temperature inside the cabinet. For what I spent and the 20 minutes it took to hook it up, I think it was money well spent.
     

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