Component vs. S-Video

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Michael Giusto, Oct 8, 2002.

  1. Michael Giusto

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    What is the difference between component video input/output and S-Video? Don't they do the same thing and separate the image and send to the correct tube?

    Then if the answer is that component is better, do the receivers that are out now convert S-Video input and send the signal out via component output if that is what you want to send to the TV?

    Reason I ask this is because I would like to keep my TV on one video input setting and that's it, basically not having to touch a TV remote except to turn the TV On which I can program on my programmable remote. But my biggest question is whether this is even possible given the various video input methods I could have going into my receiver.

    Example: (here's my setup and the input to the receiver I would like to use)

    VCR - RCA Video Cable
    DVD - Component Video Cable
    PS2 - Component Video Cable
    VCR2 - S-Video

    Can the above four devices input into a receiver and ALL output via Component Video to the TV or does each type of video in have to have a corresponding output to the TV (ie. S-video to Video 1, Component to Video 2 & RCA to Video 3 on the tv)?

    Just looking for any info. anyone can offer. Thanks! And if you know of a receiver that can do what I am asking, please let me know the model #. I'm of the understanding that this cannot be done, but it always is a good idea to ask the pros!

    Thanks again,

    Michael
     
  2. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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  3. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Practically, component will yield a slightly sharper picture if you look closely enough. I noticed a slight colour bleeding around certain edges with s-video (blown up to 84") which disappeared with the component hookup.
     
  4. TimG

    TimG Second Unit

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    The Denon 5803 will convert all signals to component. If you have $4000 to spend on a receiver. [​IMG]
    TimG
     
  5. Rich Allen

    Rich Allen Second Unit

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    The Kenwood Sovreign 5700 will convert also. Crutchfield has it for about $1600 but you can find it cheaper if you hunt arround a bit.
     
  6. Michael Giusto

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    I have a denon 3802 that will let me switch from one component input to another, but I would like something that will take ANY video input and output to TV using component. The link provided above only shows boxes that take multiple component inputs, I can already do that with the Denon 3802.
     
  7. Aaron H

    Aaron H Supporting Actor

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    The new 3803 will have 100Mhz video bandwidth and will be the first receiver in that price-class to convert all video to component, for only 1 connection to the TV.

    Aaron
     
  8. Brian Gentry

    Brian Gentry Agent

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    I think there are two issues here:
    1. Converting one type of video to another. Ok, so there are receivers that do this. Do you want to use your receiver, or use the circuits in your TV to do the conversion? What you say, what conversion is the TV doing? The component signals that are sent to the TV are almost identical to the signals needed to drive the CRTs in TVs. So, in essence, all other signals are internally converted to component by the TV before being sent to the CRTs. This includes the comb filtering done on composite sources, as well as the conversion necessary to separate Y & C (S video) into their component pieces.
    I'd say that even in a $4000 receiver, you're not going to have conversion circuitry as good as in a $2000 - $5000 TV. I could be wrong, but that's my story for now. [​IMG]
    2. Using only one input on the TV to make everything simple. If you have an investment in home theater equipment greater than say $2000, you absolutely owe it to yourself to get a quality learning remote with macros. This type of remote will allow you to easily switch between sources with a single button press and switch everything necessary on your system, including video inputs on your TV.
    I think the home theater master MX-500 is a completely *amazing* buy at ~$120 from Internet retailers. This remote includes macros for system on and off, as well as 10 dedicated macros for the 10 components it controls. Want to switch to DVD? Press and hold DVD on the main screen for 2 seconds and it does the DVD macro. Same for any other component. It's an ergonomic study as well; all buttons are in the right place.
    Don't take my word for it. Go to www.remotecentral.com . Read the review of the MX-500 and read a few of the user reviews as well. This is the best buy in remotes on the market IMHO.
    In short, get a good remote, hook up lots of video inputs to your TV and be happy.
    Brian.
     
  9. AaronD

    AaronD Stunt Coordinator

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    Lew,

    Component video isn't the same as RGB video, it's actually Y-Pb-Pr (luminance, luminance minus blue, and luminance minus red).

    -Aaron
     
  10. Mike Broadman

    Mike Broadman Producer

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    Michael,

    FWIW, I don't think there is much of a difference in picture between component and S-Video if you have a normal or small television. However, if you have something bigger than, say, 40", then if I were you, I'd place a higher emphasis on picture quality and go with component.

    Trying to use component via the receiver can be complicated, expensive, and still not garner the same results as just going directly to the TV. Brian's suggestion is true- for a much lower price than rigging some complex switching device, remote macros will do the trick. The remote I use is the Sony VL-1000 which has full learning capability, macros, and uses only hard buttons (no touch screen). It's < $100.
     
  11. Chuck Paskovics

    Chuck Paskovics Stunt Coordinator

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    At first, I wanted to run everything component through my receiver. Of course I ran into the same issues....

    VCR is only composite (RCA)
    Tivo is only up to S-video
    DVD has component

    Instead, I decided to make everything running to the tv S-video. I had to buy a converter to convert the rca to s-video (does not improve quality, but lets the receiver run everything through s-video without any switching issues).

    My dvd runs to the receiver via s-video, but also another output goes directly to the tv via component. I wanted to have the 'single easy to use' setup for the wife (all on one input).

    I have a 47" tv. I've read several places that there's only about a 5% hike in quality from s-video to component. I have to dissagree with this. I can pause a movie on dvd, switch to my s-video input and I see a huge difference in quality from component to s-video. The component colorization is so much better and 'real' looking. Quality wise is only a small improvement, but color is much better.

    So, in short, you can do what I did..have a simple set-up with everything s-video and run a separate line from the dvd directly to the tv.
     

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