component vs. s connection

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Claudia, Jan 17, 2002.

  1. Claudia

    Claudia Auditioning

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    Hello. This is my first post. My DVD & TV have component connections but my receiver does not. Currently I have the DVD hooked directly to the TV via the component connections and the audio through the receiver. Will there be a noticable difference in picture quality (on a 32" set) if I switch everything to s connections and route through the receiver?
     
  2. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    hi claudia -

    welcome to htf!

    to answer your question, i want to make sure you're talking about component and not composite cabling.

    component has three cables to separate the video signal. composite has one (typically yellow-color) to carry the video signal.

    in order of quality: component, s-video, then composite.

    use the best quality cable you can for your connections. if you do have component cabling going directly to the tv, that's the best you can do.
     
  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Darn...Ted beat me to it.[​IMG]
    I believe you WILL see a difference between Composite and SVideo even on your TV.
    Try this: go out and buy a inexpensive SVideo cable from Radio Shack and hook up BOTH feeds straight to your TV. Start a modern movie on the DVD player and using your TV remote, toggle back and forth.
    You should notice a reduction in "dot crawl" along straight lines, and that colors that intersect look more solid right up to their edges with SVideo.
    I like to do this:
    Run SVideo straight to the TV.
    Run Composite video from the DVD/CATV/VCR/... (everything) through the receiver, then one cable to the TV.
    Now your receiver can do all the switching (audio & video) and you leave the TV looking at the Receiver feed. This makes the system easy to use.
    But when you sit down to do some serious watching, take the extra step to grab the TV remote and switch to the better SVideo feed.
     
  4. Denward

    Denward Supporting Actor

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    Bob, I think Claudia already has a component connection between her DVD and TV. Why do you want her to downgrade this to svideo? Otherwise I think your suggestion makes sense.
     
  5. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    A lot of times Composite (single RCA cable) is confused with the word Component (3 RCA cables). And I have not seen too many 32" sets with Component inputs (unless they were HD sets). So my advice was based on upgrading from Composite connections.

    Claudia: Do you have a single video cable, or 3 video cables going from your DVD player to your TV?
     
  6. Jim_Stu

    Jim_Stu Stunt Coordinator

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    The reason Claudia wants to run all video through the

    receiver is to simplify things a bit.

    Recent tests on a 50" monitor only showed a 5% improvement between S-video and component video.

    I really don't tink the difference will be noticed on a 32".

    50" monitor tests:

    Composite > S-Video = 20% improvement

    Composite > Component = 25% improvement

    My 'user-friendly system........

    Video:

    IN: Cable TV > VCR > Entech converter > Reciever (via S-video)

    IN: DVD > Receiver (via S-video)

    OUT: Receiver > WEGA (via S-video)

    Audio:

    IN: VCR > Receiver (via L/R analog cables

    IN: DVD > Receiver (via fiber optic)

    IN: CD > Reciever (via fiber optic)

    IN: Tape Deck > Receiver (via L/R analog cables

    Advantages:

    1) TV is monitor only and requires only power up.

    2) All playback functions are controlled by receiver's remote.

    3) Very few wires.

    Disavantages:

    1) No PIP
     
  7. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  8. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    The comparison of different video hookups was done by Home Theater Magazine around the August 1999 issue. They use a "reference" 50" RPTV and found:
    Composite: baseline
    SVideo: 20% "better" than Composite
    Component: 25% "better" than Composite
    They also noted that larger displays showed MORE improvement between the different connection types, smaller displays showed less.
    I think this is why 2 people both try a expensive video cable and get different results. The guy with the larger display has a system more sensitive to small changes.
    Makes sense. Magnify anything and eventually you start to see defects/irregularities you did not see before.
     
  9. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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  10. Colin Dunn

    Colin Dunn Supporting Actor

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    First, in response to the original post...

    Component video (matched set of 3 RCA video cables for Y/Pr/PB or Y/Cr/Cb) is in theory the best way to connect your DVD player to the TV.

    However, very few (if any) receivers will switch component video sources. If you also have a VCR or personal video recorder, those may be S-video only.

    It is only a slight compromise in picture quality to 'downgrade' from component video to S-video. However, the improvement in ease of use for the whole system may be compelling enough to justify the slight decrease in video quality.

    If you try both S-video and component video connections and find that you can't tell the difference, I say use S-video and go for the ease of use. If you are bothered by the degradation, then you're becoming a true-blue HT nut (meant as the highest possible compliment!!!) and would rather put up with the inconvenience of changing inputs on your display.

    But under no circumstances should you downgrade to composite video (one RCA cable for a color video signal), unless you have no alternative. Few TVs/projectors have good comb filters. With composite connections, most TVs exhibit an annoying "zipper" effect on edges (look at stock tickers, score readouts during sporting events, lines on a basketball court, etc.).

    To Jim_Stu:

    What was being measured for the 20-25% "improvement" over composite video?

    Was it overall video bandwidth? Horizontal resolution ("vertical lines of resolution")? Vertical resolution ("horizontal lines of resolution")? Color temperatures? Signal amplitude loss? Noise levels?

    Since most displays have a poor quality comb filter ("zipper" effect in abundance), composite can be unwatchable on really big screens. To me, "unwatchable" is more than a 20-25% degradation over the clearly defined edges you get with an S-video or component connection...
     
  11. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Colin: the magazine article admitted that the criteria was very subjective. Of course it was not based on lines of resolution/signal loss/etc. These are either fixed or trival reductions.

    They did take reviewers who were very experienced at evaluating displays, adjusting outputs, etc., (people who know how to spot the defects/problems on NTSC and HD sets).

    The obvious jump from composite to SVideo was because SVideo bypasses the internal comb filter on the TV. This reduction of dot-crawl and bleeding of colors is obvious even to me with my modest 50".
     
  12. Claudia

    Claudia Auditioning

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    Thanks for all of the info. My video connection DVD to TV is with the three 3 video cables (component) not composite. With the help of all the information y'all offered I decided to stick with the component connection mainly to preserve the PIP function on the TV. The VCR is going through the receiver so I can eliminate at least that remote.
     
  13. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    after all that, she really *did* have component! now that's comedy! [​IMG]
     
  14. Denward

    Denward Supporting Actor

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    Claudia,
    I want you to remember that I believed you had component all along. I figure I deserve brownie points for that.[​IMG]
     
  15. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    denward! you know we have a strict anti-brownie points campaign here... [​IMG]
     
  16. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    I make no apologies because with Claudia, doubting her ...equipment will not cause brused ego's.[​IMG] (And Yes, I do live with a bunch of women. Why do you ask?)
     

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