Component Video Switching

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Lon_Coleman, Nov 16, 2001.

  1. Lon_Coleman

    Lon_Coleman Agent

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    I am in the market for an Onkyo receiver, I am really wanting the 696. But there was a deal where I could get a 595 for $209.
    My wife really wanted for to save $300 and get the 595, my problem started when she asked why I need the 696. I told her I wanted Component Video Switching. She said" What the [email protected] is that?
    Could someone come up with an explanation that my wife would understand??
    Thanks guys
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    You could say,
    "Component video switching allows us the convenience of select HDTV off the air or from cable together with DVD, easily using the remote, and also preserves the full sharpness of DVD."
    Be forwarned, all component video switching is not created equal. There is the bandwidth issue, you will need 25 Mhz minimum for 1080i HDTV, 14 MHz for progressive scan DVD. You will have to do the research to find out if the A/V receiver you want has adequate video bandwidth.
    Other video hints: http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. Lon_Coleman

    Lon_Coleman Agent

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    Man, I feel like I am awefully slow. I guess its still not clear what it does or how I would use it. More importantly, is it worth the $300 difference?
     
  4. Vin

    Vin Supporting Actor

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    Lon, does your TV have component video inputs? If so, does it have more than one set? Probably not.
    How many video sources do you have that offer component video outputs? Your DVD player may have component video outputs and if you have an HDTV decoder/receiver it will also have component video outputs.
    Well, if you have two sources with component video outputs and your TV only has one set of component video inputs, how would you hook them both up at the same time? This is where component video switching comes in handy. You would be able to run both sets of component video cables (one from your DVD player and one from your HDTV decoder/recevier to your A/V receiver and then connect the component video outputs from your receiver to your TV. Now your receiver can be used to select which video source to be displayed on your TV.
    Keep in mind though, as Allan has explained, that although a receiver may have component video inputs, it must be capable of handling the required bandwidth for a given video source.
    So, if you don't require the ability to pass two component video signals on to your TV, (keeping in mind the requirements for progressive scan DVD and HDTV) then you probably don't have a need for component video switching.
    Hope this helps.
     

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