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Component Video Switching for HDTV & Progressive Scan?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bryan G, May 7, 2002.

  1. Bryan G

    Bryan G Extra

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    I have a rather generic questions based on something that a sales rep at my local good guys said. I mentioned that I was interested in getting a progressive scan DVD player and eyeing a HDTV and would be in need of a AV receiver that performs component video switching because of the outputs from the HDTV and progressive scan DVD player. These are things currently on my wish list. I just received blessing from the wife to upgrade. The rep mentioned that with 480p output from a DVD player and 1080i output from a HDTV decoder box, component video switching was not needed. He said (and with not any AV receiver in mind) that they could not perform the component video switching for both progressive scan and HDTV. He said one component output from the AV receiver to HDTV television set would not work with a 480p and 1080i input. He suggested running video straight from the HDTV set top to the HDTV television and also straight from the progressive scan DVD player to the HDTV television. He said only to run sound from the HDTV set top and progressive scan DVD player through the AV receiver.

    Can anyone explain if you can run 480p and 1080i into an AV receiver and then output only one component connection to your HDTV television? Will this work? Even if this does work, is it common to bypass your AV for vide switching and go straight into the television, assuming the television has enough component inputs to accommodate your needs. Can this question be answered without specific AV receivers identified?

    Regards, Bryan
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Yes the receiver can handle component switching for HDTV, progressive scan DVD, and interlaced DVD all at the same time. It depends on the TV's input being able to select, preferably automatically, which is being supplied at the moment by the receiver.
    The quality of the video will be degraded if the receiver video paths don't have enough bandwidth. 720p (needs 37 MHz) will be the first to be affected, then 1080i (needs 37 MHz but can get away with 24), then 480p (needs 14 MHz), then 480i (needs 7 MHz).
    If the receiver degrades HDTV, it will degrade it the same way whether or not other video formats share the receiver inputs.
    Going directly to the TV gives the best results simply because there are fewer things in the video path. This works of course only if you have enough inputs on the TV.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. Bryan G

    Bryan G Extra

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    Thanks for the information. Perhaps that was the point the sales rep was trying to make that with some TVs you may need to select the input if it can’t automatically detect the signal type. And if you have to select the signal type, then why go through a AV receiver. What would that feature be called on a HDTV where the TV can automatically select the video being supplied to it? Does that have a common name?

    Sounds like my best option will be to go straight to the TV for DVD and HDTV and through the AV receiver for all other inputs such as VCR, PC, etc.

    You lost me a bit on how to determine video degradation based upon bandwidth. I will go to your link to read up on that.

    Much appreciated.
     
  4. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Uhhhh... With respect to Allen, I have heard differently.

    The HD TV Insider newsletter reported last year that while some receivers that offer Component video switching work fine for Component, they dont have the bandwidth to properly handle HD signals. Only the "Flagship" receivers (Dennon 5800, Yamaha RX-V1) passed things through with minimal high-frequency reduction.

    I have noticed that the latest models of some receivers specify "HD Component Switching". Some were in the sub $1,000 range so you should be able to find one that fits your budget.

    Remember to buy while planning for the future:

    - DSS based HD receiver

    - Set Top Box (STB) for Over The Air (OTA) local signals

    - XBox with Progressive output

    - DVD with Progressive output

    Good Luck.
     
  5. Bryan G

    Bryan G Extra

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    Quick follow-up. What is the feature called when a HDTV can detect and appropriately display a signal that is either 480p, 720p or 1080i?

    Also, does anyone have a suggestion on ratings for adequate amount of bandwidth to switch HDTV and Progressive scan video?

    Allen stated

    The quality of the video will be degraded if the receiver video paths don't have enough bandwidth. 720p (needs 37 MHz) will be the first to be affected, then 1080i (needs 37 MHz but can get away with 24), then 480p (needs 14 MHz), then 480i (needs 7 MHz).

    So would a receiver that states 50MHz be adequate to switch without degratation since the highest requirement is the 1080i and 720p both requiring 37 MHz.

    Here is a line from a Sony receiver spec sheet - 4 optical, 2 coaxial component video switching: 2 in, 1 out (50 MHz bandwidth)

    Regards, Bryan
     
  6. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    50Mhz is adequate as long as you don't need to switch RGB (found on front projectors). You should also check the specs for HD-ready TV sets... many cannot resolve the full bandwidth for 720P or 1080i in the first place (so spending extra $$$ on a receiver that can may be a waste of cash).
     
  7. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    unless the manual clearly states what the MHz capability is....i suspect the only way you'll know for sure if the receiver has hi-bandwidth component capability is to contact the manufactuer and ask their tech support.
    a quick scan of my crutchfield sales flyer shows that the onkyo 797 ($1K) has 50MHz, the denon 2802/3802 ($800/1k) have 27MHz
    so bob's correct in stating some sub 1K receivers may have what you're looking for.
    take a look at the following crutchfield link - they seem to give out the MHz rating where applicable:
    http://www.crutchfield.com/cgi-bin/S...=4&s=0&g=10420
     
  8. Bryan G

    Bryan G Extra

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    Thankyou both for your insight. I will keep an eye out when I start to shop for an HDTV that it can resolve the full bandwidth for 720p or 1080i. I had not considered that an HDTV could not do that.

    I have been surfing that same crutchfield link to get detailed specs on equipment. It is a very good link.

    Ted,

    Have you been to the Audio FX store on Howe avenue? They opened a store in Folsom, but don't carry any equipment. I was wondering if the Howe avenue store is worth a visit?

    Bryan
     
  9. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    hey bryan -
    didn't realize you were a sac native! [​IMG]
    i have not been to either audio fx (didn't even realize they opened one in folsom), but have been wanting to check them out for some time.
    the only place i really like going is the paradyme by arden. the newest paradyme in roseville is a nice place, but the sales people there haven't given me the time of day in the three visits i've made.
    if you decide to swing by audio fx let me know... [​IMG]
     
  10. Bryan G

    Bryan G Extra

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    Ted,

    The store that Audio FX opened is just a demo store. They have two rooms with finished home theatres. Nice show rooms. The sales rep said it is for educating the public about home theatre.

    We live in Folsom. If I go to audio FX on Howe, I will let you know what I think. Seems close enough to paradyme to do both.

    Bryan
     
  11. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    cool bryan - let me know when you head out there..maybe i'll try to meet you there...we can go listen to all their stuff and drool [​IMG]
     

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