Component video input/output questions

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by Jill_S, Oct 30, 2003.

  1. Jill_S

    Jill_S Auditioning

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    Hi. Could someone please explain the uses of component video inputs and outputs on a receiver? Several receivers I've looked at (such as Denon AVR-1603) seem to have inputs but no outputs. Or am I just reading the specs wrong?

    What would be the use of having inputs but no outputs? If there is no output, does that mean I can't run a high definition video signal through the receiver? I don't have an HD tv now, but would like to in the future (wouldn't we all?).

    If I understand correctly, I could run the HD signal directly to the TV without going through the receiver, and some seem to think this is best. My question is, how much of a pain is this, user-wise? Could I still use one remote?

    I'm new to this, so I hope my questions make sense. Thanks.
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    Welcome to the forum!

     
  3. Jill_S

    Jill_S Auditioning

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    Thanks for your response. In my defense, the spec sheet I looked at from Denon was here: oops it won't let me post a link. Well, you go to the Denon site and click on "Products" then "Receiver" then the little icon next to "Full Line Product Comparison Chart".

    The chart compares the various models and shows nothing under component video out for the 1603. I thought that was kinda screwy! Thanks for providing the other link which clarifies things.

    One more question: are there ANY advantages to routing the component video signal through the receiver?
     
  4. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  5. Tim K

    Tim K Second Unit

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    As Michael mentioned, the advantage is in a situation like this...

    say you are watching a DVD on your progressive scan DVD player. You have component out to the TV for video and Digital Coax to your receiver for Audio. Now suppose you want to pause the DVD and flip to monday night football in HDTV to check the score. Suppose your Cable box is connected by component to your TV and by Optical cable for your audio. To switch from DVD to HDTV you would have to change the input on your TV from input 1 to input 2 to get video, and change the input on your receiver from DVD to TV to get the sound.

    If you use the receiver to handle video switching as well, you only have one set of component cables from your Receiver to your TV input 1, and when you switch the input on your receiver to TV, it switches the audio and video thus saving you from switching it on your TV.

    Of course, if you have a programmable remote that does macros, this convenience loses its appeal as the remote simply switches TV inputs as part of the macro. That's what I do....plus it saves me from buying an extra set of cables!
     

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