Component Video Bandwidth

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Randolph Damore, Jan 6, 2003.

  1. Randolph Damore

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    Hey all,

    What is the significance of the bandwidth rating for component video switches? Is higher bandwidth necessary for a cleaner signal - and if so, how much is required?

    My Yamaha HTR-5550 has 30Mhz of component bandwidth. The switch I'm looking at has 230Mhz of bandwidth. Will this actually do anything for me?
     
  2. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi Randolph. Welcome to HTF!
    All cables/devices will start to reduce a signal at some frequency. Despite popular belief, this is not bad. The REAL problem is that much of the signal is reduce a bit, but the upper-frequencies are reduced a lot more. (If everything was reduced the same, it would not be much of a problem.)
    A few facts:
    Component Video Max Frequency: 4 Mhz
    Progressive Video Max Frequency: 13 Mhz
    1080p HD Video Max Frequency: 35 Mhz
    To be on the safe side, engineers sometimes take the highest possible frequency, double it (or even quadruple it) and look for cables/components that can handle the inflated number.
    (Remember, you have the effect of the cable GOING to the switch, the switch, the cable going to the TV all combining.)
    Yamaha vs dedicated switch
    From the numbers above, I would have to say that switching through the Yamaha would be as good as switching through an external switch until you start feeding true 1080 HD video.
    An advantage to a dedicated switch is the number of devices they can handle, and some of them take a mix of optical/coaxial digital audio and convert all to a single type. This can really extend the life of an older-but-great receiver.
    This thread on Inexpensive HD Switching might give you a few more options.
    Hope this helps.
     
  3. Randolph Damore

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    Thanks for the information - that clears things up quite a bit. The primary reason for my switch box will be for video game consoles - PS2, GameCube and an X-Box.

    In the case of the PS2 and GameCube - which at most output a 480p signal - 30Mhz should be fine. The X-Box on the other hand does 1080i and 720p.

    If I'm getting this right, a 30Mhz switch will lose some sharpness for 1080i signals and not really be noticable. What about 720p though?
     
  4. Neil Joseph

    Neil Joseph Lead Actor

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    Real Name:
    Neil Joseph
    A little off topic but what kind of frequency can RG6 cable handle? Many component cable runs use this cable type.
     
  5. PaulT

    PaulT Supporting Actor

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