Component/S-Video/RCA (is there a best I/O)?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JuliusW, Jan 15, 2003.

  1. JuliusW

    JuliusW Auditioning

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    A few questions for you connector buffs...

    With all the variety of input/output methods (component/S-Video/RCA) on the back of most components, is there a best?

    What about digital (Coax vs. Optical)?

    Outside of aesthetics, is there a qualitative reason that a person might prefer one type of connection over another if each of the components in the system has the complete variety of I/O?

    Thank you for your input (pun intended).
    -Julius Wu
     
  2. PaulT

    PaulT Supporting Actor

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  3. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi Julius. Welcome to HTF! [​IMG]
    First, you need to separate VIDEO from AUDIO in your connection types. Lets start with:
    VIDEO:
    Home Theater magazine tested all 3 types from a single DVD player to a single, "Reference" 50" RPTV. Here is what they concluded:
    Composite (single RCA cable): baseline
    SVideo (funny connector): 20% better than Composite
    Component (3 RCA cables): 25% better than Composite
    The article noted that the difference is GREATER for larger screen sizes, and less for smaller displays.
    NOTE: All progressive scan DVD players and HDTV decoder box's use component cables for their output. It's quickly becoming the standard way to hook up video components.
    AUDIO:
    Most people go with coaxial-digital as the cables tend to be cheaper, more robust and you may have a spare video cable lying around. Yes, the coaxial-digital cable is simply a video cable. All video cables are made with something called "75 ohm coax". This is what the people who designed the SPDIF specification had in mind. A common video cable.
    Optical is fine too, but some blind tests have shown a difference in sound using one optical cable. This variation was never explained and is confusing to those of us who have studied computers and digital signals. If the cable messes up the bits, the receiver should reject the entire frame and go quiet.
    So go with coaxial-digital to avoid controversy.
     
  4. JuliusW

    JuliusW Auditioning

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    So, technically speaking, the short answer sounds like my optimal solution is to go with component video and coax-digital audio connections.

    I did not want to rehash an old topic, but I could not seem to get a good result to my initial search query on HTF. None-the-less thanks Paul and Bob for your replies.

    Basically, I do not own a TV. Never have, probably never will. Whoa! you say... Actually, all I really care about is the home theater experience. Instead of a TV, I have been using projection as my means of video output.

    Anyway, I have been piping video signals to the projector using the standard HD15 serial connection from my computers. But, now I have decided to take the big leap and build a real home theater with all the goodness you have come to love.

    Thus, I have decided to join this terrific resource and website. Thanks again!

    -Julius Wu
     

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