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Columbia's "Requiem for a Heavyweight" (100m version vs. 87m version) (1 Viewer)

Thomas Hart

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Hey, guess which one Columbia released on DVD today!
Yep, the shorter, altered 87m version. And guess what I picked up today before I found this out!
According to IMDB, Leonard Maltin's Guide, and several other sources, RFAH was originally released at 100 minutes. Some new footage was added and scenes were removed for 87-minutes TV version. So, I can choose between the widescreen and fullscreen version, but not the orginal and altered versions.
GRRRRRRRRRRR!:angry:
How can Columbia release great DVDs like "Macbeth", or the upcoming "Memento" & "Starship Troopers". But at the same time release edited fullscreen films like this or "Midnight Clear".
Ironically, this probably have one of the better looking Columbia DVD covers I've seen in a while (if ever). Too bad I'm probably going to return it!!!! (unless somebody can talk me out of it).
 

Rain

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So let me see if I understand this.
They released the film in the theatrical aspect ratio, but it's the TV edit. :confused:
What the hell is going on at Columbia/Tristar anyway? :rolleyes
 

Robert Crawford

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Thomas,

For clarification purposes let me state some facts about this film. First off, this film's theatrical release time was 87 minutes and Columbia without the approval of the director, reinstated 13 minutes of nonessential scenes that had been cut from the original release print to make the feature longer. This so upset the director Ralph Nelson that he asked his name be removed from the film's credits. Furthermore, Ralph Nelson was also the director of the original television presentation that this film is based from in which Rod Serling wrote the television play and film.

I'm fine with Columbia's decision to release the 87 minute version because the film seems to flow better with the shorter version. Longer doesn't necessarily means better.

Crawdaddy
 

Herb Kane

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I just got around to watching my copy last night of Requiem for a Heavyweight (1962) and just wanted to say that this is one amazing looking disc. This is a drop-dead gorgeous looking transfer of a magnificent film.
Great job Columbia. C'mon, dig deep - give us more...
 

Gordon McMurphy

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It's a great film, but it on my 200-title wish list, so I'm not sure when I'll get around to it. However, since you say the transfer is "drop-dead gorgeous", it may be in my collection sooner rather than later!

And you're right: Columbia should be digging deeper into their catalogue. Bunny Lake is Missing was most appreciated, recently. Again, a drop-dead gorgeous anamorphic 2.35:1 transfer of a film that has been very hard to see in the last ten years.

The Columbia title I want the most is Budd Boetticher's extraordinary psychological Western, The Tall T, which, in my opinion, contains Randolph Scott and Richard Boone's best performances. It has some of the best dialogue you'll ever hear in a Western (the story was conceived by Elmore Leonard and the screenplay was by Burt Kennedy). Coumbia own quite few of Budd's Westerns, but it seems a very big butt is sitting on them...
 

Robert Crawford

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Gordon,

I understand your impatience with Columbia, but judging by what they're releasing next month from their western catalogue, I don't think it will be much longer before they release some of Scott/Boetticher westerns to dvd.

Crawdaddy
 

ArthurMy

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Especially since TCM has been showing an absolutely stunning print of Commanche Station, and I've seen a print of Ride Lonesome that's spectacular.

And I wasn't around for this thread when it first appeared, but thanks to Robert Crawford for clearing up the two cuts. I love Requiem, and the only way it's watchable is in its original 87 minute cut, which I saw way back when at a sneak preview just prior to the film's release. Anyone who prefers the 100 minute cut is, in my opinion, well, certainly not a film buff.
 

Gordon McMurphy

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I've seen a print of Ride Lonesome that's spectacular.
Was that at the Film Forum in New York, Arthur? The Film Forum has been showing a lot of new prints of truly great Westerns this year, like High Noon (curtesy of Paramount, one presumes, who have done a lot of photo-chemical work on the film as well as digital refining for the DVD) and Columbia has indeed made a new print of The Tall T, which the Film Forum has shown, so I really hope to see a DVD very soon.

Boetticher was a great filmmaker, no question about it. It has aggrieved me that very few of his films have been released on DVD over the last seven years - especially the legendary Randolph Scott Westerns - and his career deserves a full evaluation that would involve all his best films being made available again on video.
 

Dave B Ferris

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Great news from Crawdaddy. I'll instantly buy any of

the Boetticher/Scott films released on DVD.

I'd also like to see some of Guy Madison's 'noir

westerns' released on DVD by Columbia.
 

ArthurMy

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Gordon - yep, Boetticher is a very undervalued director - most of today's DVD buyers don't have a clue as to who he is or what he's done. I'm also praying that the BATJAC/Paramount deal will include one of my favorite of the Boetticher/Scott westerns - Seven Men from Now.
 

Jeff Adkins

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Seven Men From Now said:
It's coming. It was on a list of titles listed in Video Business magazine that Paramount was working on as part of the deal along with Hondo, McLintock, and The High And The Mighty.
 

Jon Hertzberg

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I saw all the Boetticher westerns that Film Forum has shown so far in its "Essential Westerns" series and they looked quite good overall, especially The Tall T. I am no expert, but to my eyes there were some inconsistencies in the prints of Comanche Station and Ride Lonesome. Comanche Station seemed overly dark at times, but I could not tell if this was the original intent of the filmmakers or something to do with the projection. Both prints seemed to fluctuate from clear and colorful to muddy and slightly dull.
Can't wait for Columbia to get off its duff and get these, and the rest of the Boetticher titles it controls, out on DVD.
 

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