Color warmth setting and Avia calibration. Any advice?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeremy Anderson, May 19, 2001.

  1. Jeremy Anderson

    Jeremy Anderson Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 1999
    Messages:
    1,049
    Likes Received:
    0
    I was fiddling with the settings on my TV again (i.e. calibrating with the Avia disc), and I came across COLOR WARMTH in my TV's menus. I can't find any information on what this setting SHOULD be set to... cool, normal, or warm.
    The manual for my TV says:
    "Cool for a more blue palette of picture colors; Normal; and Warm for a more red palette of picture colors. The Warm setting corresponds to the NTSC standard of 6500K." It looks like the COOL setting corresponds to 9300k and the NORMAL setting corresponds to 7500k (because the colors react the same way at those settings as they do on my computer monitor, which lets you adjust between 9300, 7500 and 6500).
    So does this mean I would want to set it to WARM and then calibrate saturation and hue with Avia to get it to NTSC standards? I'm confused...
     
  2. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2001
    Messages:
    963
    Likes Received:
    0
    Jeremy, you should set the color temperature first (which affects the greyscale) before calibrating. Changes to the greyscale will affect (to varying degrees) contrast, brightness and saturation/hue, I've found.
    cheers,
    --tom
     
  3. Jeremy Anderson

    Jeremy Anderson Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 1999
    Messages:
    1,049
    Likes Received:
    0
    But set it to what? Warm?
     
  4. ThomasL

    ThomasL Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2001
    Messages:
    963
    Likes Received:
    0
    Jeremy, that depends on your personal preference but if the manual says Warm is 6500K then most likely Warm is going to give you a greyscale that comes closest to 6500K (at least at the high and low end I would assume) which is the NTSC standard. Withour a color analyzer, it's impossible to say whether or not it really is 6500K. And it's impossible to say if you'll like the DVD picture at that setting, standard or not but you may want to give it a try and give your eyes time to adjust to the "redder" picture.
    cheers,
    --tom
     

Share This Page