Coaxial Cable question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Robin Smith, Oct 13, 2001.

  1. Robin Smith

    Robin Smith Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2000
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I am having a house built and am doing some network and cable tv wiring on my own. I have free access to quantities of coaxial cable that was used for an old coax network. The cable is RG-58U.
    Since its free, I'd like to use it if its suitable for cable TV. Does anyone know if it is suitable for TV signal? I would think that it would be better as a network is probably more picky about signal quality than TV but I don't know enough to say that with confidence. I don't want to run a whole bunch of it and then find it won't work once all the walls are sealed up.
    The other question is, if it IS suitable, can I connect multiple pieces together using the network BNC adapters that are on the end. Most of the lengths have the adapters on the end and I have some of the lesbian adapters used to connect two pieces together for networking.
    So whats the verdict? Is it better or worse? Can I connect multiple lengths together. Please only answer if you are confident becasue I don't want my house all wired up with cable that is useless.
    Thanks in advance.
    Robin Smith
     
  2. Bill Lucas

    Bill Lucas Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 1999
    Messages:
    530
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Robin,
    You should use high quality RG6 cable and the runs should be uninterrupted. I do custom audio/video installations for a living. Good luck.
     
  3. Robin Smith

    Robin Smith Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2000
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the answer Bill.
    So what is the difference between RG-6 and RG-6/U and what about RG-62. I know my speaker and RCA cables, but never really thought about coax before except for buying (probably crappy) off the shelf video cables for hooking my VCR to my cable outlet.
    Thanks
    Robin Smith
     
  4. Clay Autery

    Clay Autery Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2000
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Last winter I completely re-wired my house for SAT/Cable, OTA, TELCO, and DATA to correct the simply shameful pile of crap that had accumualted in the attic and walls.
    For SAT/Cable/OTA, Bill is absolutely correct. Use the best quality RG-6 you can find/afford. Paying more does NOT necessarily mean that it is better cable however.
    In addition, you want to absolutely minimize the number of breaks in the cable between the source and your display. And when you DO have to break the line, use the best quality connectors you can find/afford. I personally use only 3 piece crimp on type connectors (pin, housing, crimp barrel).
    I don't pretend to be an expert by any stretch, but I know MY installation performs superbly with ZERO glitches.
    I used Canare cable, connectors, and patch panel. I paid a little more for it, but the difference in performance is night and day.... AND
    Most importantly, I will never have to go into the attic again to mess with SAT/Cable, TELCO, or DATA wiring... ever. [​IMG]
    Some other hints... IF you decide to dump cable (I did) and go with SAT and Off the Air (OTA), you will of course have a SAT dish(es) and an OTA antenna most likely.
    Do yourself a favor NOW, since you are building, and do the following:
    1)Wire the house with a data closet (maybe the top of a hall closet or something).
    2)Put a patch panel in the closet with 2 x #rooms in house of ports on it or better.
    3)Run TWO cables to EVERY room in the house from the patch panel (Top quality RG-6 or better with COPPER shielding in at least one of the layers)
    4)Run RG-6 or better from each source to the data closet. Since (in my instal)these runs are longer, I replaced the RG-6 with RG-11. This is how my source runs broke out:
    a) homerun RG-11 all the way from the Cable company distribution box in the utility box at the street to my data closet (eliminated the un-needed cable box in the wall on the outside of my house... they connect/disconnect at the street) That OLD cable from the street to my house was nasty... and only had like 50% coverage ALUMINUM braid instead of near 100% copper braid. I also discovered that there was serious water infiltration into the cable company's amplifiers and other components in the box (they have yet to replace them, which is why I dumped AT&T cable.
    b) 4 each homeruns of RG-11 from the DishNetwork Switch 64 to my data closet. (for four separate receivers in my house... I use the patch panel to choose which four outlets in the house get the SAT signal) I would have preferred to put the SW64 in the data closet, but there are six runs of cable from the two dishes to the switch and four from the switch to the receivers. A lot of cable savings to leave the admittedly weatherized SW64 outside mounted on the chimney (I mounted a shield over it anyway.
    c) homerun of RG-11 from the balun on my Winegard 9085 UHF antenna all the way to the distribution amplifier in the data closet (DA splits/amplifies signal to go to 4 outlets (patch panel selectable)). NOTE: Antenna coax DOES have to be grounded, and usually a break in the line is made to insert a grounding block. I avoided this break in the line by inventing a proprietary device that allows me to pull a ground off the outer braided shield and take it via 8GA solid copper to the dedicated 8ft copper grounding rod driven 18" below grade, 6ft from the base of the foundation of my house. (all other leads are similarly grounded).
    d) another RG-11 homerun was pulled from the anticipated location of my dedicated FM antenna directly to my FM tuner (bypassing the data closet to avoid ANY breaks and to minimize length).
    AND... in each room, the SAT/Cable, OTA ANT, DATA, 2 TELCO lines are all terminated to six place keystone plates, and the plates are located AT LEAST 16" from AC outlets.
    OK... so I gave a LOT more info than was necessary... maybe.
    I wasn't doing so to show off my wiring job (though I am proud of it). [​IMG] I did so to illustrate that getting a quality signal from the source to your display is not simply a matter of putting together wire from one point to another. It takes planning (for current and future requirements) and care in component selection.
    Hope this gives you some ideas. When I build my house, I will DEFINITELY spec out the signal wiring scheme myself. [​IMG]
    ------------------
    [Edited last by Clay Autery on October 14, 2001 at 11:57 AM]
     
  5. Robin Smith

    Robin Smith Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2000
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Wow! Thanks for the detailed reply. My builder has run COAX to 3 locations using RG-6 cable (although I am sure its not high-end). I added a second run to one of the rooms on the opposite wall today so we would have a choice of TV locations without having to run ugly extensions in the room. All of the runs end up in the garage which is where the cable provider brings the service.
    I have run my own Cat5 data cable to all three bedrooms and both living rooms. My data wiring "closet" will be under the stairs in the basement. I ran the Cat5 to each of the phone jack locations. I will come back on my own after construction is complete and replace their stock phone jacks with phone/data jacks. I am adding an additional phone run to the wiring closet in the basement so that my DSL modem and DSL router can be located down there instead of by the computer.
    I have just thought that it would be smart to run COAX down there also as this is the future location of my home theatre.
    Now is the time to do it!
     

Share This Page