Coax or Optical from DVD to Reciever?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mike__D, Aug 14, 2001.

  1. Mike__D

    Mike__D Supporting Actor

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    Which is better? I'm currently using coax but was wondering if Optical will be better.
    Thanks,
    Mike D.
     
  2. Brian Corr

    Brian Corr Supporting Actor

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    Don't sweat it! Either does the job and if you can hear a significant difference, your ears are better than mine!
     
  3. MarshawnM

    MarshawnM Stunt Coordinator

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    Mike,
    I also use coax. I am a Network engineer, and fiber optical cable is harder to handle (bend radius, end connector, etc). If the optical cable has slight errors, it will degrade your signal, in my opinon stick with the coax. Optical is useful when you are going far distances, but in a home theater implementation, I wouldn’t consider it.
    Marshawn
     
  4. Mike__D

    Mike__D Supporting Actor

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    Thank you both, I was just curious. Everything sounds great with the coax, just wanted to know if I'd benfit from optical.
    Mike D.
     
  5. LesterLiu

    LesterLiu Extra

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    in my opinion, digital is digital, it doesn't matter how the signal gets there, its just a bunch of 1's and 0's regardless.
     
  6. dougW

    dougW Stunt Coordinator

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    Well, I agree with Marshawn on this one. There can be a difference, and you can hear it. Optical goes through another step in decoding, so you cannot say they are the same, and a lot of how well an optical handles this is based upon the quality of the RX/TX optical signal decoder can cause the process to create a more "digital" sounding soundstage. Usually that's due to the quality of the optical transistor in the RX part as well as perhaps transistors that follow in the signal path. In essense, something happens during the decoding process by inferior optical decoders to take away the smoothness capable with a good quality digital coax.
    Lex
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    Lexman's Theater
     
  7. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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    quote: Wheres the guy who uses the coat hanger for his coax?[/quote]
    ... who ensured that all the bits got through to the other end intact, but didn't know or care to measure jitter.
    Just had to throw that in there [​IMG]
    [Edited last by Saurav on August 14, 2001 at 06:34 PM]
     
  8. Mike H

    Mike H Stunt Coordinator

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    The guys name is Al Magnani(sp) and he can be found at hometheatertalk at last sighting. As far as I am concerned jitter does not affect Dolby Digital or DTS. Unencoded PCM is a different story.
    Mike
     
  9. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  10. Mike H

    Mike H Stunt Coordinator

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    From what I remember of this test it was just Dolby Digital. They used a Dolby Digital packet analyzer or whatever that thing is called and it recorded 0 errors over the coat hanger connection.
    The second question [​IMG], it's both. I've read enough that in my mind Jitter does not affect Dolby Digital or DTS, and that's about as far as I know as well. [​IMG]
    As for CDs, I've seen differences in the cable. I made one cable using Canare RG6 and I made another using Carol Quad Shielded RG6 and I liked the secondary better. The only problem was the length and I'm out of connectors.
     
  11. Saurav

    Saurav Cinematographer

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  12. Nicholas A. Gallegos

    Nicholas A. Gallegos Stunt Coordinator

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    Jitter doesn't affect Dolby Digital or DTS signals, because they are both packeted bitstreams. Unencoded PCM signals can be affected critical by the quality of the transmission medium, however.
    As far as the optical vs. coax debate, it's a lost cause. I personally hear little, if any difference between the two with my equipment. A $15 shielded 75-ohm video cable used as a digital coax cable sounds no different to me than the $60 optical cable connecting my DVD player to the receiver. Go fig, eh?
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