Co-worker's wife looking for karaoke speakers (semi-prof.)

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by Adam Bluhm, Feb 3, 2004.

  1. Adam Bluhm

    Adam Bluhm Supporting Actor

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    A co-worker of mine has a wife who used to be the shyest gal around, but since she took the stage of a karaoke bar one night, she's never turned back. She'll actually get upset if she's not called up enough!

    That has lead to her wanting to venture into doing karaoke work semi-professional at small halls and bars around the area. That's basically the application. There aren't really any super-large arenas she plans on doing.

    The situation: Her husband told me she has already purchased a karaoke machine. I'm assuming it has no amplification (he wasn't sure) but does processing only. The climate around here can be quite cold in the winter. She'll probably have to carry it outdoors for only a few minutes at most when transporting them.

    Basically, they were wondering what a good approach is to getting proper power to them? I'm all about accurate sound, so I began swaying them away from pa monitors (which is popular for some karaoke people aroud here), but didn't want to misinform them. Should they go with a good receiver and floor standing speakers or powered monitors?

    To give you an example of their budget, they were looking at a set of Behringer monitors, which roughly retail for ~$300/ea. Initially I thought a good receiver and nice floorstanding speakers would do it, as I said above, but the cold weather transportation got me wondering.

    What do you people think the best approach would be?
     
  2. Danny Tse

    Danny Tse Producer

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    If she's going to be going into professional or semi-professional karaoke work, definitely go with professional PA monitors.

    For home karaoke, floorstanding speakers and a high-power receiver should be more than enough. I currently have a Sony stereo integrated amp (not ES series) from the late 80s powering a pair of Sony floorstanding speakers, with a Pioneer karaoke laserdsc player, in my karaoke system. Using a analog Radio Shack SPL meter, this sytem regularly hit 100dBs, if not over. No problem at all for over 10 years.
     
  3. Adam Bluhm

    Adam Bluhm Supporting Actor

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    Okay. I did more research and I'll go along with what you said. It'll either be powered monitors (is that a double positive? [​IMG] ) or a two channel amp with speakers made for karaoke. One of the larger benefits may be the durability of the speakers. They have hard grills on them and are made out of solid materials.

    One question, though. Most karaoke speakers have large 10"+ drivers, even up to 15". It seems pairing a tweeter with a 12" driver is mismatching and will give horrible frequencie curves. Are frequencie curves important for a proffessional or should she just be worried about putting out !sound!?
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    A valid point, but it’s not as bad as you might think. The reason is that these speakers (at least any of them that are worthy of consideration) use horn-loaded compression drivers for the high frequencies, and they are typically good down to 1500-1000Hz. Most large woofers have no problem playing up that high, which insures a good blend.

    Nevertheless, if that is a primary concern, a company called Carvin makes speakers that add an 8” driver for better midrange definition.

    Rounding out the package, you’ll need stands for the speakers, since the ones your friend will be looking at are to small to put on the floor. And, since the karaoke machine probably isn’t “roadworthy,” I suggest getting a small suitcase for it, with foam padding added on all six sizes, for transporting it.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  5. Adam Bluhm

    Adam Bluhm Supporting Actor

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    Thanks a bunch for the info, Wayne.

    One of her goals is to connect a seperate CD player so she can have seemless switching of a song to background music. That can be done with a mixer, correct? She was initially looking at this for both mixing and EQ capabilities.

    http://www.soundtech.com/products/djkaraoke/kj3000v.asp

    I think I'm understanding this for the most part. [​IMG]
     
  6. Mark gas

    Mark gas Second Unit

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  7. JunoVazquez

    JunoVazquez Stunt Coordinator

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    check on the products of Audio2000 or Vocopro. She would need a Karaoke Mixer and an AMP and rugged speakers.
     
  8. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Adam,

    That one’s more for DJ use, from what I can tell from its features. Something like this would work and be cheaper:

    http://www.soundtech.com/products/mixers/ST802.asp

    Keep in mind, you’ll have to have a separate amp or active speakers with this one or the karaoke mixer you linked above.

    Here are some of the powered mixers I was talking about:

    http://www.soundtech.com/products/mixers/pmx200r.asp

    http://www.soundtech.com/products/mixers/pmx100r.asp

    http://www.peavey.com/products/shop_...MPM/c/1/mp.cfm

    The only downside to these is that you have to use two channels for the karaoke, with totally separate controls, so you’d have to match EQ and volume settings for both channels (the non-powered mixers can gang the two inputs to one set of controls). Plus, they have one mono amp. But they are cheaper than a separate mixer and amp.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     

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