'clip' sign on receiver

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Cagri, Jan 6, 2003.

  1. Cagri

    Cagri Second Unit

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    Hi, I have this Kenwood krfv5050d receiver which will be replaced soon (hopefully) and when an analog input is higher than it should be, there is a 'clip' sign blinking on the front panel. Is this the same 'clipping' which damages the speakers or something different? When I listen with high input level in low volume, I don't hear any distortion, but it keeps blinking, that is why I wondered, because there must be distortion if the amp is clipping, is that correct? And by the way, I am leaning towards Denon avr1802 to replace the kenwood, do you think it will be a good choice? 1802 is 80w p/c but seems they are pure watts whereas the Kenwoods claimed 100w p/c is far from the real power of the receiver. As the Denon is also a budget receiver, I still can't be confident if it will make a difference and would like to hear an expert opinion. Thanks !
     
  2. Yogi

    Yogi Screenwriter

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    I am pretty sure the clip means clipping on your Kenwood. There probably is some distortion that you are unable to discern. You could be having a short in your speaker leads that is causing the receiver to go into clipping. Try reconnecting all your speakers and see if you still see the 'clip' indication.

    IMHO the 1802 would be a good replacement to your Kenwood. In fact if you could come up with some extra $$$ it might be better for you to get a closeout 2802 that you get you into 6.1 and that way you wouldn't have the urge to upgrade for format reasons.
     
  3. Cagri

    Cagri Second Unit

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    Yogi, thanks. I don't think it is a short in speaker leads because it stops when I adjust the input level. Of course it isn't that I listen at higher than normal input levels and get that 'clip' blink, but I wanted to know if it is that usual 'clipping' of the amp and if it may cause damage to speakers even at low volumes.

    And I think I ll go with the 1802, don't care about 6.1 because of room limitations anyway.
     
  4. John Royster

    John Royster Screenwriter

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    you can also clip the inputs as well and that may be what is happening. If the incoming signal is clipped or the voltage is too high then you actually cause clipping in the pre-amp stage.

    I think kenwood has some means to decrease the sensitivity of in input by 5-8 db so you can try that.
     
  5. DanielSmi

    DanielSmi Second Unit

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    John is correct, I've also noticed this when I play certian cd's through analog cables. What I think it is is that when the music is recorded it's recorded at a loud level since there is no standard for CD audio for who loud it should be different bands record at different volumes. The cd's I listen to that do this is Blink-182 and Eminem, when I first got these cd's I noticed that they were louder than the other cd's I had; Eminem being louder than Blink-182. I have 49TX (see below) and a red "over" comes on when the pre-amp is clipping. I just select the Input attenuate option and it gets rid of the problem, another way to solve the problem is to use digital cables instead of analog if your cd player has digital outputs.

    Daniel Smith
     
  6. Cagri

    Cagri Second Unit

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    Thanks for your replies so far. I have been reading older posts on clipping as well, and am still a bit confused. Here's a quote:
     

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