Click here for REAL size of your widescreen TV.

Discussion in 'Displays' started by M_a_r_k^NE, Jun 6, 2004.

  1. M_a_r_k^NE

    M_a_r_k^NE Agent

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    O.k. fellow HT nuts. Here I have the real size of your widescreen tv when watching DVD movies. Sorta a conversion chart. Old crt full screen TVs are 1:33 aspect ratio. Your widescreen standard TV aspect ratio is 1:78. Most movies are made in 1:85 and 2:35, so you're gonna get the black bars at top and bottom becase the ratio is longer to fit intop your standard widescreen of 1:78. Of course this whole thread is based on if you DO NOT use the zoom button and watch the movie in its purest form.

    So if you're watching a 1:85 movie on your wide screen you lose 2 inches diagonally. Watch a 2:35 movie and your TV loses 4 inches. Watch movies beyond that like 1963 movie: "Its a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" in 2:55 you lose even more. These figures are measured diagonally from top corner to opposite bottom corner. So for example below using a 50 inch widescreen TV:

    Watching 1:85 movie: Your 50 becomes a 48 TV
    Watching 2:35 movie: Your 50 becomes a 46 TV

    In my opinion, always buy a tv a little more in size than you're looking for. If you want a 48. Get a 52, etc. because its gonna shrink viewing wise when watching movies. Of course regular tv watching is o.k. and stays at 1:78 with no black bars.
     
  2. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Are those inches?

    I measure mine in feet. [​IMG]
     
  3. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    hehe, same here... 8.3 feet diagonal in 4:3 [​IMG]
     
  4. Adam Tyner

    Adam Tyner Screenwriter

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    Although with overscan, the 50" TV displays a 50" image.
     
  5. Jonty Rees

    Jonty Rees Stunt Coordinator

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    A handy rule of thumb, but those differences of 2" or 4" or whatever will change depending on the size of the pic. e.g. it might be 2" on a 50" diagonal wide screen TV, but it'll be less than that on a 40", and more than that on a 60".

    I believe the percentage loss on a 1.78:1 TV watching a 1.85:1 movie would be, (deep breath):

    ((((1.78/1.85)^2 + 1.78^2)^0.5 / (1.78^2 + 1)^0.5) - 1)*100

    Sub in 1.33 for 1.78 if you have a 4:3 TV, sub in 2.35 for 1.85 if that's the aspect ratio of your movie.

    Turns out you lose 0.895% of your diagonal showing a 1.85:1 movie on a 1.78:1 screen, or only 0.45" if you have a 50" diagonal. Move to a 2.35:1 movie and now you're losing some serious diagonal, 5.3% or 2.6"

    Loss on a 4:3 TV is obviously worse.
     
  6. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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  7. M_a_r_k^NE

    M_a_r_k^NE Agent

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    You guys got me there. Nice arithmetic.
     
  8. Eric Samonte

    Eric Samonte Screenwriter

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    Like GW used to say 4 years back..."You're using fuzzy math!"
     
  9. Jonty Rees

    Jonty Rees Stunt Coordinator

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    W probably had someone else take his math exams for him - it all looks fuzzy to him.
     
  10. Justin_D

    Justin_D Stunt Coordinator

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    Using DaveF's link:

    This is interesting. 32" 4:3 TV compared to 30" 16:9 like many companies such as Sony are doing:

    Comparing a 30 inch 16:9 TV to a 32 inch 4:3 TV

    30 inch 16:9 Set 32 inch 4:3 Set
    4:3 (1.33:1) NTSC mode 4:3 (1.33:1) standard mode [70.6% larger]

    * Your viewing area is 19.6 in(w) x 14.7 in(h)
    * Total viewing area is 288.12 sq in.
    * This is the equivalent of a 24.5 inch 4:3 TV



    * Your viewing area is 25.6 in(w) x 19.2 in(h)
    * Total viewing area is 491.52 sq in.

    16:9 (1.78:1) native mode [4.1% larger] 16:9 (1.78:1) letterbox mode

    * Your viewing area is 26.1 in(w) x 14.7 in(h)
    * Total viewing area is 383.67 sq in.
    * This utilizes the full display of the 16:9 TV



    * Your viewing area is 25.6 in(w) x 14.4 in(h)
    * The diagonal size is 29.4 in
    * Total viewing area is 368.64 sq in.
    * This is the equivalent of a 29.4 inch 16:9 TV
    * Your viewing area is decreased by 25.0% from 4:3 mode

    16:9 (1.85:1) letterbox mode [4.2% larger] 16:9 (1.85:1) letterbox mode

    * Your viewing area is 26.1 in(w) x 14.1 in(h)
    * The diagonal size is 29.7 in
    * Total viewing area is 368.01 sq in.
    * Total area is 15.7 sq in. (4.1%) smaller than 1.78:1



    * Your viewing area is 25.6 in(w) x 13.8 in(h)
    * The diagonal size is 29.1 in
    * Total viewing area is 353.28 sq in.
    * Your viewing area is decreased by 28.1% from 4:3 mode

    16:9 (2.35:1) letterbox mode [3.8% larger] 16:9 (2.35:1) letterbox mode

    * Your viewing area is 26.1 in(w) x 11.1 in(h)
    * The diagonal size is 28.4 in
    * Total viewing area is 289.71 sq in.
    * Total area is 94.0 sq in. (24.5%) smaller than 1.78:1



    * Your viewing area is 25.6 in(w) x 10.9 in(h)
    * The diagonal size is 27.8 in
    * Total viewing area is 279.04 sq in.
    * Your viewing area is decreased by 43.2% from 4:3 mode


    EDIT: Well, that didn't turn out the way I was hoping it was. Basically, in widescreen modes, the 30" is bigger by only about 4%, but in 4:3, the 32" is 70%+ bigger. Maybe I will go with a 4:3 TV after all.
     
  11. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    That's what I did two years ago. This was particularly useful knowledge as the WS TVs were distinctly more expensive than the 4:3 sets.
     

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