Cleaning Widescreen - Advice please

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Natalie M, Jul 29, 2002.

  1. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

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    OK, we've read the manual for our Hitachi 53 widescreen and it suggests a soft cloth for cleaning. What do you guys use to clean your screen? Ive had my set for just a month and Im afraid to touch the screen, but I think its time for a cleaning. Could you offer some advice please?
     
  2. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Of course it's time for a cleaning.

    Now, I have a pair of nice direct-view sets, and I use two ultra-soft cloths intended for cleaning eye glasses. And I also use a non-amonia-based cleaning fluid (also intended for non-reflective eye glasses). I spray the fluid onto one of the cloths, and wipe gently in vertical strokes. Then I take the other cloth and wipe similarly (but with no fluid).

    In between cleanings (which occur weekly), I occasionally take one of the soft cloths a gently dab at the screens to remove dust.

    Another approach would be to use distilled water in combination with a very mild detergent. (This usually results in a screen that needs cleaning much less frequently; but it is not as convenient as the eyeglasses fluid.)
     
  3. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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    Thanks Jack,

    I was interested the replies to this this query as my new 60" needs a through cleaning and I'm a little intimidated by it also. The guys that dropped it off commented, 'No windex, water only'.
    I understand the ammonia based restriction, but knew that water alone would not be enough over time.

    I get an 'impression' from your posts on this forum that you likely take very good care of your A/V equipment. Appreciate your response.
     
  4. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

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    OK, I dont have any eyeglass cloths, all I have are paper towels, and shop cloths, but they're not smooth. Thats what worries me. If I go to the store to look for a cloth, what should I look for, i.e., any brandnames, specifics? I know you are not supposed to use windex, my manual states warm water and a mild detergent. Im trying to make sure I have this straight before I clean. Thanks again.

    P.S. On a different note, I just got a Playstation 2. I like to play it on the widescreen. Ive only had it for 2 days so, my question is, in light of the possible burn-in, how long is too long? I mean when I play its for about 1-2 hours and its not necessarily the same game in that time frame. My set is not on torch mode. So should everything be ok?
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Natalie:

    Do NOT use paper towels on that RPTV. If you do, I'll arrange to have people come over to your place and take the set away.

    Go to any Lenscrafter's store or to an eye doctor's (which is what I do) and ask for the softest-possible cloths intended for cleaning glasses. Ask for several. You can also find a non-amonia-based fluid from such an establishment as well. (Explain to the people who work there what you need the cloths for--tell them your monitor's screen is very delicate, which it is.)

    Even cloth diapers are little too coarse for this sort of operation (and I used to use diapers for waxing motorcycles). You need the softest-possible material.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. SteveMo

    SteveMo Stunt Coordinator

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    Armor all safe for tinted windows

    -Steve
     
  7. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

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    Believe me, I had NO intentions of using paper towels, thats why I was asking what to use. I figured they would be a big no-no for my baby. Anyway, does Lenscrafters charge for these things? Pardon my asking, but does the Walmart eyecenter carry the same thing? thanks again.

    P.S. Anyone have any answers for my playstation question (stated above)?
     
  8. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    • If it were me, Natalie, and I owned that set--all that money, all that time to look forward to screening films--I would not use it for playing video games. There is a definite risk of burn-in, and I think it's fair to say the CRTs are being put through more strenuous use to begin with when projecting a video game. So, I would consider another monitor for that sort of stuff, no matter how thrilling the game might be on an RPTV. GIven they are comparitively fragile compared with direct-view sets (no matter how better-performing they are), I would reserve the centerpiece of my home theater to films and broadcasts. My two cents.

    • If a Walmart eyecare center is a reasonably equipped place to get better-than-average eyecare products, by all means check them out. The cloths I use I get for free because they are from my own doctor's office. But they wouldn't be that expensive at all--no more than a dollar or so each. Same with the fluid. (But do bear in mind that the detergent-and-warm/distilled-water solution produces the very best and longest-lasting results. And when you do the job, clean small portions of the screen, one after the other; time-consuming but worth it.)
     
  9. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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    Jack, if you don't mind, what brand of detergent have you used with sucess?
    And my cleaning mode is kicking in, what do you think of a bit of vinegar in water for a finish rinse with a damp cloth?
    To help knock back the streak effect tendency of water mixed with detergent on glass like surfaces, since Windex and streak resistant products like it are a no no.
     
  10. Dennis Pagoulatos

    Dennis Pagoulatos Supporting Actor

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    Wow...this is like the Martha Stewart of HT threads! Is there any way to make a nice floral arrangement by coloring and folding the used cloths? :wink:

    Seriously though...it's as if Jack and I were raised on the same planet, I used cloth eyeglass wipes to clean my direct view as well; they work great (I also use them to clean my computer monitor)

    -Dennis
     
  11. Dan Lindley

    Dan Lindley Second Unit

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    My wega manual warns against windex, but I've never understood why. And what's the matter with paper towels... Gulp...

    Forgive me, for I have...

    Dan
     
  12. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

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    I think its because paper towels can scratch. Regarding the playstation, I do have my 27 inch tv, which the 53 replaced. Only problem is, its in the bedroom, right next to my 2 yr olds room, so it would be a stretch to attempt to play in there. Although, if I had to I would, my question is, are video games, even at 1 hour at a time or less, more likely to burn in than other images, i.e., CNN?

    For cleaning the screen, someone suggested Plexus plastic cleaner, from Home Depot. Anyone heard of this?
     
  13. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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  14. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Windex and other commercial glass cleaners are amonia-based, and that can ruin the anti-reflective coating that's standard on most direct-view displays. And, correct, paper towels are far too abrasive--especially in regard to an RPTV's extremely delicate screen.

    Mary is correct in that I take obsessively good care of my stuff--the main system is basically covered when not in use (except for the speakers). The electronics receive dustings every week, and the faceplates get a gentle QTip-based cleaning (water, detergent, and TLC) on a monthly basis.

    Result? The equipment looks as if it has just been removed from the shipping cartons. This also contributes to longer life: Dust is a major contributor to internal heat build-up. (It's recommended to remove the cabinet of a direct-view set annually and use an airbrush-type device to blow out the inevitable dust.)

    Vinegar? Nothing about that sounds bad--as you do have to concern yourself with streaking when using detergent and distilled water. That's why I suggest, with an RPTV, cleaning small portions of the screen instead of trying to do the whole thing all at once.
     
  15. Dan Lindley

    Dan Lindley Second Unit

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    Well, Mary, let's not be too hasty - I hope. I've only used windex and paper towels 2-3 times.

    As they say, there's a last time for everything.

    Now that I look at it, the sony manual says use a cloth and water, that's all. No liquid or aerosol cleaners.

    Dan
     
  16. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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    Just teasing Dan, should have put lots of smilys in.
    I'm sure no harm done YET. [​IMG]
    But it was a close thing till Natalie posted!
     
  17. David-T

    David-T Extra

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    What I use to clean my RPTV screen when it is pretty dirty is the cleaner they use for window tint since this does not have any ammonia in it or harsh chemicals. I then wipe it down with an eyeglass cloth. If the screen only has a few spots on it I use a few drops of distilled water on the eyeglass cloth and wipe the spots with this. You can get the concentration from an auto parts store and mix it with distilled water or you can ask a window tint place if they know of any place to get some. I used this for 15 years on my old Mitsubishi television and I am currently using it on my new Mitsubishi, with no problem. You also do not want to wipe the screen with a dry cloth, because the dust will act as an abrasive (fine sandpaper if you get my drift). For dusting the screen I use a fine duster and barely touch the screen with it. When using the eyeglass cloth you do not want to rub to hard because this will scratch your screen too, speaking from experience. I found this out because I use the eyeglass cloth to wipe my window tint, instrument panel and wood dash in my vehicle and I scratched my wood dash by rubbing to hard. I guess I go over board when I do my cleaning and my wife kind of thinks I'm crazy, but my stuff looks still new. I also cover all my remote controls with clear shrink-wrap, so if there is a spill it won't get ruined. If you use the clear shrink-wrap on your remotes be very careful you do not over heat it with a blow-dryer and do not use a heat gun on it, unless you want melted or warp plastic.
     
  18. Natalie M

    Natalie M Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks Mary, glad to be of some help! As for keeping stuff clean, I use to be as determined when it came to electronics, until I had a baby. Now, I'm lucky if I can get half of something dusted. LOL, I cant remember the last time I detailed the A/V rack, which is something I used to love doing. Unfortunately, I have to look for quick, effective yet safe ways, of keeping the equipment clean. There's no way I could keep my stuff covered, since it is the main system. But, I'll be going shopping this weekend, and I hope to find what I need to clean my screen.
     
  19. Dan Lindley

    Dan Lindley Second Unit

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    Mary, no problem. You never know though. Maybe you are a straight talking type. I usually take threads with JB in them pretty seriously, except when he recommends family-friendly movies (joke re a recent post of his).

    It is dumb of the Wega manual not to specify the consequences of windex, etc. Geez. Some vague admonition sure didn't deter me from such an egregious abuse. And tucked in the first three pages of such admonitions.

    Aside: have you noticed you can't buy a toaster without three pages of safety admonitions??? No wonder I didn't take seriously a warning that was preceded with the caution not to stick the antenna in my ear...

    Dan
     
  20. Mary M S

    Mary M S Screenwriter

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    “not to stick the antenna”
    I’m surprised they did not start including picture’s of tiny people shoveling mashed potatoes into VHS slots, with Big Red X’x over them after that commercial spot years ago. Ah, the consequences of litigation.
    I use strange sentence structure on the web, in an inept attempt to get my conversational pauses and ‘tone of voice’ across. I do talk straight, --and crooked-- and too much. But you can usually tell with me, if I’m short and staccato, …it’s a joke.
    I am always polite if something ‘bad’ is going on, when I sound outrageous I’m off in my ‘fey’ mode, I’m queen of the quip, comes from going toe to toe with too many colorful males in my life.

    Natalie don’t feel bad, JB would take my gear into protective custody if he saw my dust level, and I no longer have the very important reason of very tiny ones to care for. (Just a nightmare of a business).
    You asked about plexi glass type cleaners. I would think that might be a cleaning method which could work well. I would check out the Home Depot suggestion or possibly research Aviation windscreen products as a candidate critically tested and designed carefully not to scratch, or in the reverse if warranted; to remove scratching. But only after checking with some professionals for compatibility. Often the best results are the least expensive, simplest and work very well. Unless I start scrubbing the dust around too much on the face of my screen creating fine scratching, since its fresh and new, I’m going to try and stick to the water/detg method. Jacks maintenance schedule is one we should all try to follow.
     

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