Cinemotion: is there a difference?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by JenaroM, Aug 9, 2002.

  1. JenaroM

    JenaroM Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a 36XBR450, and a Sony Dream System DAV-S300. I have it connected via SVHS with Monster Cable (the S300 doesn't have component video output).

    On my TV, when I switch from Interlaced to Cinemotion while watching a DVD, I don't really notice a difference. Is there something I'm missing? What improvements on the picture should I look for? Or does Cinemotion only work if you have component inputs? Or maybe the Cinemotion function is turned off on the service menu?
     
  2. JasonRH

    JasonRH Second Unit

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    Cinemotion works, but the effect is subtle. For example, look at the edges of buildings or other straight-edged objects both with cinemotion on and off. With it off the straight lines are often jagged. With it on they appear smoother. I specifically remember noticeing the effect on the movie Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. Near the first of the movie there is a village that shows a slow pan of a building and the edge is jagged with the 3:2 pulldown off. The edge appears smooth with cinemotion on.
     
  3. Allan Mack

    Allan Mack Supporting Actor

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    Below are two screen shots which might help illustrate the differences between Interlaced DRC and CineMotion DRC with your non-progressive scan (ie., interlaced) DVD player.
    Although the screen shots are a comparison between the playback of a progressive scan DVD player and the playback of a standalone interlaced DVD player, it's similar to the differences you would find between the CineMotion DRC and Interlaced DRC modes on your XBR450:
    Image from a progressive scan DVD player (CineMotion DRC would produce a similar image)
    Image from an interlaced DVD player (Interlaced DRC would produce a similar image)
    Both images are from the beginning of chapter 29 of the movie Seven. You will notice that the first image is a lot smoother, especially the diagonal lines of the building. This is what CineMotion DRC will do, albeit not as smoothly as a true progressive scan DVD player. (In reality, the image produced by CineMotion DRC will be a little between the two images posted above, but closer to the first image than the second.)
    Another good test is the beginning of chapter 6 of Toy Story. As the camera slowly pans from right to left, a door is being opened. The lines in the door moulding look jagged in Interlaced DRC mode but smooth in CineMotion DRC mode. A progressive scan DVD player will make these lines even smoother still.
    How do I know all this? I also have a non-progressive scan DVD player (Panasonic RV31) hooked up to my Sony 36" XBR450. I tested the XBR450 with a very good progressive scan DVD player (Panasonic RP91) and did not find it worth the big difference in price just to get slightly smoother lines. In other words, CineMotion DRC with my el cheapo non-progressive scan DVD player was good enough for me. But now that progressive scan DVD players are getting cheaper...[​IMG]
    By the way, CineMotion will work regardless of type of connection, whether it be composite, S-Video or component.
    Anyway, hope this helps!
    P.S. Use CineMotion DRC for film-based material (example: movies on DVD). Used Interlaced DRC for video-based material (example: cable TV). Use Progressive DRC for still images.
     
  4. Allan Mack

    Allan Mack Supporting Actor

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    I forgot to mention: those images above were taken while the movie was playing. When comparing CineMotion DRC to Interlaced DRC, it's important to toggle back and forth between the two modes while the movie is playing. If you put the player in pause, you will not notice anything different. (It helps to use the A-B Repeat function when doing such comparisons...)
     
  5. JenaroM

    JenaroM Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks, Allan.
    I tested the Cinemotion functionality with the Toy Story DVD on chapter 6 as you recommended, and I immediately saw what you were talking about. I can now see the difference, and I know now what to look for.

    Are there any other improvements that I can see? Or does anybody have any other examples?
     
  6. Allan Mack

    Allan Mack Supporting Actor

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    You're welcome, JenaroM.

    Other things to look for: car grills, window pillars in buildings and cars, the patterns in people's clothes, power lines, wall tiles, etc. These will all exhibit jaggies and/or shimmering in Interlaced DRC, but will mostly go away when using CineMotion DRC.

    Other than that, the differences are pretty subtle, and the casual observer probably won't notice any differences. I once viewed an entire movie in Interlaced DRC mode and was wowed by the image quality. I didn't realize I hadn't switched to CineMotion mode until it was all over.

    I think a progressive scan will give you even better results, however. You just have to buy/borrow one to see if it's worth the extra cost. I'm thinking of doing this despite my experience last year as mentioned above. Perhaps I didn't give my eyes enough time to adjust to the image produced by a progressive scan player, which seemed too soft at the time. I've been told since then that you can actually see more fine detail with a progressive scan player...
     

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