Choice of wood for endcaps? OAK?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by jeff lam, Jan 30, 2002.

  1. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I'm thinking about what to use for my endcaps on my sonosub I'm planning. I want a nice oak look but don't want to veneer the edges of MDF. Can I use 1 solid peice? Do they come that big? I'll need it to be about 18 1/2" dia. and 1/2"-3/4" thick. What are my options for a nice finish on top and on the edges?

    I will also roundover the edges from both sides to get a complete roundover.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Brian Fellmeth

    Brian Fellmeth Supporting Actor

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    Hmm, a 2 by 2 foot by half inch square board should do it. I've never sen one. May have to join two planks. I have seen rounds of a parquet like solid wood at HD or lowes. But don't dismiss the option of veneering MDF. Here is my solution :
    long board sub
     
  3. James Slade

    James Slade Second Unit

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    Jeff,

    I just built an very similar end cap out of cherry. It can be done with a few boards very easily if you have access to some woodworking tools, and some patience.
     
  4. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    We used 2 oak 1"X12" glued together for a cosmetic end cap for PeteG's ported 1503. I certainly wouldn't use oak for the part of the end cap inside the tube. Pete's functional end caps are doubled 3/4" MDF
     
  5. Thomas, More info on that sonosub please=)...ie pics etc=)
     
  6. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Anthony

    I have a ton of pics but they aren't compressed, edited or uploaded. It's a 20" diameter tube, gross internal volume 195L. It's tuned to 18.4Hz using a 29.5" port with dual 6" AeroPort flares. Tube is lined with a layer of acoustical foam from PE. 4" long spacers between the bottom end cap and the base plate. Top 12" grill is covering the flare. The black tube covering is automotive headliner material. Basically a black nylon mesh bonded to a foam back. Attached with Scotch spray adhesive. Oak has a mahogany stain with a cherry Watco oil finish.
     
  7. James Slade

    James Slade Second Unit

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    Thomas,

    I think I see at least two other in progress subs in that pic, are you running a factory or something? It sure looks like fun. That sub looks great!
     
  8. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    James
    That's 'Tube-Zilla' dual 1503's in a sealed alignment.
    [​IMG]
    Should be operational this W/E.
    Factory no, just a serious addiction [​IMG]
     
  9. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    TW,

    How did you make that cap? 1"X12", is that 1" thick? or 1" wide X 12" long. That doesn't make sense to me. You should have 3 dimentions to it. Length X Width X Height.

    Anyway, That's exactly what I'm looking for.

    I need more details on how you did it exactly.

    Thanks!

    BTW, I will be using 1.5" MDF for the PLUG. That's what I call it. The plug is what will sit inside the tube, the cap will sit on the outside.
     
  10. TW, If your is "Tube Zilla", then what is mine called? =).."Tube Zillie"!?
     
  11. Dustin B

    Dustin B Producer

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    Jeff, what I think he is saying is he bought a 1"x12" plank of oak. Then he cut two 24" long pieces out of that board. Then put the two pieces together (biscut join I would guess, but I'm a novice wood worker so I don't really know) to get a 24"x24"x1" board that he could then router into an endcap.

    Did you have access to a planer to do this Thomas? If not how did you get the whole thing flat?
     
  12. Actually, you don't need a planer, you need a joiner and a set of vertical glue presses. they allow pressing from all4 sides. Since the wood is pressed onto a flat even surface, all the pieces end up being glued at the same elevations...just needs to be sanded..noplaning necessary
     
  13. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    I am assuming he meant 12'(feet) not 12"(inches). I was wondering how he got 2 24"(inch) peices from a 12"(inch) board. Still, doesn't the plank have a width to it also?

    It seems like it will be difficult to laminate the peices together, maybe I should just use veneer after all.
     
  14. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Hi
    Sorry for the confusion, that's what happens when I post while having a migraine [​IMG]
    Pete bought 2 pcs precut of 1"X12", 24" long (actually 3/4" thick) from Home Depot. He did a good job finding pieces that had matching grain. All we did was square the long edges on the table saw. I don't have a joiner or a planar. Trying to get them flat would have ended up taking 1/4" thinner. They were put together with biscuits and TiteBond II. Power sanded to level. It was attached with epoxy and clamps.
    [​IMG]
     
  15. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    OK, now I undestand. How hard is it to do biscuits? I have never done any laminating of wood before. Did you have any problems with the wood curling at all or was it pretty flat?
     
  16. Chris Hoppe

    Chris Hoppe Stunt Coordinator

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    If I understand what's happening by the picture, you are laminating a piece of oak to a piece of MDF.

    You may very well have trouble with that down the road. The oak will swell and shrink with the weather, while the MDF will stay pretty stable. The force of the oak straining against the MDF could cause warping or cracking. We're talking about a lot of potential force too! It could even come unglued...
     
  17. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Both oak boards had a slight amount of crown. They were glued together with the crown up in both boards. This was the best match for the wood grain, and it avoided using the small amount of heart wood each board had. This joint was allowed to cure for 48hrs. The clamps (seen in the picture) were more than enough to flatten the whole thing, and the epoxy makes sure nothing will bow over time.
    Biscuits are a piece of cake, much easier than dowels. Of course you must have a tool to cut the slots. It can be done with a slot cutting bit in a router. I use one of the DeWalt biscuit tools
    Chris
    First we're in Denver not much humidity here. Second the entire thing is stabilized by 8-2.5"long deck screws that are holding the 12" diameter speaker grill frame in place. These penetrate through the oak and well down into the 1.5" thick MDF internal endcaps. So I think we're safe. Your point is well taken though. Many years ago I made a storage unit for stereo equip by laminating 4" oak flooring to particleboard kitchen cabinets. As the oak dried it tore the cabinets apart.
    [​IMG]
     
  18. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Producer

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  19. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    Colorado may not have extremes in humidity, but here in the NE, we've got plenty!

    For a square top you could apply solid wood edges on oak MDF (or whatever) pretty easily. For a solid wood top, you would be better off to glue only down the center length of the top and use mechanical fasteners for the rest. You can get desktop fasteners for this at a good hardware store (looks like a figure 8). This will allow the panel to expand and contract across its width while staying centered. If you pull a driver out, you can anchor it by just using screws with oversized holes in the top of the enclosure.

    Pete
     
  20. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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