Chicken Pox Vaccine

Discussion in 'After Hours Lounge (Off Topic)' started by Jeff Perry, Mar 9, 2004.

  1. Jeff Perry

    Jeff Perry Stunt Coordinator

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    The vaccine thread scared me, so I started a new one.

    I'm in my early thirties and have never had chicken pox. Is it true that everyone gets it sometime in their lives? Is the vaccine safe for adults and should I be considering it? My children have not been vaccinated against chicken pox, either.
     
  2. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    I had it when I was 24.

    I'm still here. Itched like made for a couple of weeks but that's about it.

    The same virus causes shingles which is more serious in adults.

    I wasn't even aware you could get a vaccine for it. It's not one of the shots that kids over here get.
     
  3. Bob_Bo

    Bob_Bo Agent

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    Everyone can have varying reactions to Chicken Pox. It's usually more serious if you get it as an adult, however it's not usually life threatening.

    My brother (3 years my junior) got it about 8 years ago (mid 30's). He was fine except for the expected fever and skin lesions, which were more an embarrassment then anything. I think he was out of work for a week or so. I got the vaccine around the same time and was fine.

    I think the accepted train of thought on the vaccination is to not vaccinate the children, if they get it--fine, they bounce back quickly. Adults are usually recommended to get the vaccine due to the complications that can arise.

    I doubt that everyone will get Chicken Pox sometime in their life. I went 35+ years before getting vaccinated.
     
  4. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    I caught chicken pox in 1984 from my daughter.

    And let's put it this way: When it really finally hit (after about two or three days of influenza-like symptoms), my face began to resemble the lunar farside. And I itched unbelievably bad -- and stupidly scratched. Meanwhile, over the course of those first few days (with their omnipresent nausea), I went from wondering if was going to die to wishing I could die.

    I've never felt so ill as an adult.
     
  5. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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    I had chicken pox in my mid 30's, man did I feel like crap. Plus there was the pain and itching from the pox. I even wound up with the virus in one eye ! Not good.
     
  6. Carl Miller

    Carl Miller Screenwriter

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    I'm 39 and never had Chicken Pox, or a vaccine. Oddly, both my kids had it last year, and I still didn't catch it.

    My doctor advised against the vaccine when I asked about it a couple of years ago, but I don't recall what his explanation was for that.
     
  7. Joseph S

    Joseph S Cinematographer

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    Did he check for antibody titers? Maybe you had only a minimal initial response.
     
  8. andrew markworthy

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    I had chicken pox in my early thirties (just to add to the tension, when my wife was pregnant with our first child - luckily she didn't catch it). Let's put it this way - I have had trigeminal neuralgia, I've had a tooth abscess that broke my jaw, and neither came near to the pain from the headache I had before the spots came out. Utterly utterly vile. The spots are horrible, you itch like crazy and feel like your limbs have been injected with concrete.
     
  9. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    I had chicken pox as a kid, but shingles when I was around 27 (I think) -- IIRC you must have had chicken pox to get shingles?

    Anyway, it started off as "the mother of all headaches" (remember that term? [​IMG] ), which just persisted over several days for no apparent reason. At the same time, I developed one small patch of blisters on the side, which I didn't associate with the headache. So on a repeat visit to the doctor, initially all I could do was moan about the headache, and all she could do was prescribe painkillers, then "by the way, here's this funny skin thingy" at which point she immediately diagnosed the problem as "herpes simplex" --which frightened the bejeezus out of me at first (I'd been a good boy up till then...) until she explained that's chicken pox/shingles, and since I'd apparently (from her point of view, she didn't know until she asked me) had chicken pox, it was shingles.

    Zovirax cleared up the problem pretty quickly.
     
  10. Brian W. Ralston

    Brian W. Ralston Supporting Actor

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    This is true. Basically...the chicken pox virus (after it does its beautiful work on your body)....will go back up into the nerve endings and hibernate until later in life...where it will most likely one day remanifest itself as a wonderfully painful thing known as shingles.....or as some patients I use to see when I was a clinical research tech referred to it as....."Hell on Earth."

    If one never has chicken pox...you can NOT get shingles later in life. This is a good thing. Yet on the flip side.....if you never get chicken pox as a kid (like myself).....getting it as an adult is the other version of "Hell on Earth." This is a bad thing.
     
  11. Yee-Ming

    Yee-Ming Producer

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    So, damned if you do, damned if you don't. Sounds typical for most things in life [​IMG]
     
  12. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    I had a minor case as a child, I don't know if I'm immune to it or not now, I hope so.
    I didn't know there was a vaccine either.
     
  13. Jason L.

    Jason L. Second Unit

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    I had it in my senior year of high school, and boy did it suck.

    Since then, from time to time [every 6 months - year], a chicken pox mark will appear randomly and then disappear after 2 weeks. Does this ever happen to anyone else?

    Because of this, I decided against having the smallpox vaccine because I feared of having a bad reaction to it.

    My friend told me that when a child in his neighborhood had it, parents would send their kid over to play with the infected child to catch it, because at a young age effects of chicken pox are relatively minor.

    It make you wonder - Small Pox must really, really, really, suck!
     
  14. Mark Murphy

    Mark Murphy Supporting Actor

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    I've never had the chicken pox (I'm 29) but have spent time around numerous people who had it. My three year old had the vaccine but still developed a mild form of it. I had myself tested and I was not immune. I guess I've been lucky. I got the vaccine soon after and It did make me feel lousy for a day. That was a few months ago and no side effects.
     
  15. ChrisMatson

    ChrisMatson Cinematographer

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  16. Angelo.M

    Angelo.M Producer

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    Let me try to elaborate on the issues here.

    First, like the Hepatitis B vaccination and the MMR vaccination, the duration of immunity provided by the varicella (chicken pox) vaccine cannot be predicted. So, there is justifiable concern that children who receive the vaccine and never get the wild-type disease may experience a decrease in their immunity later in life, leaving them susceptible to a full-blown case of varicella. Also, some children who receive the vaccine develop what resembles a mild case of pox, and these kids might develop shingles later in life.

    If you lose your immunity, then you will be susceptible to varicella as an adult. Most immunocompetent adults that develop a first varicella infection will have pox of varying severity. However, immunocompromised adults are susceptible to very severe varicella infection, including varicella pneumonia, which can be life threatening.

    I still believe that varicella vaccination is a good idea. I also think that it would be very reasonable to have your children's titers checked at some point in the future. Perhaps the current generation of kids getting the vaccine ought to have titers checked just before they head off to college, such as has been done with the MMR vaccine.
     
  17. Eric Kahn

    Eric Kahn Guest

    I had chiken pox as a kid, about 3 or 4 I think
    I had the small pox vaccine when I was 6 before we moved to germany (father in service) in 1970) had a bunch of other shots then too, can't remember what they were, remember the small pox one because my arm did not swell up like my brothers did after I got it
     

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