Channel levels adjustment question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Andre Barros, Mar 14, 2003.

  1. Andre Barros

    Andre Barros Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2003
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is it normal to have to adjust the levels of your channels for different movies you watch? In my case, sometimes the movie sounds perfect with all the channels at the same level but sometimes I have to raise the center channel level or lower the surround to make the sound better. Any thoughts?

    Regards,

    André
     
  2. Mike_J_D

    Mike_J_D Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2003
    Messages:
    213
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey Andre, I know what your saying. Usually I just turn up the master volume. Did you check your levels with a SPL? If not you might want to do that. Does the volume in your center channel only decrease on DTS movies? Or does it do it on both DD and DTS? DTS is notorious for the center channel being low and having more surrounds.

    Welcome to the forum.....even though I've only been a member a little bit longer then you. Hope this helps. Mike
     
  3. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    There is a calibrated level you can achieve with a test disc like Avia, once I've set that, I don't find myself tweaking the levels (as some films just ahve less surround activity than other for example- I don't try to rework my equipment to make everything the same).

    -Vince
     
  4. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 1999
    Messages:
    6,061
    Likes Received:
    25
    Location:
    Katy, TX
    Real Name:
    Wayne
    Aaron,

    I do feel the need on occasion to boost the center channel. But it’s pretty rare. With me it’s not that there just isn’t enough happening in the surround channels. Typically it will be with an action flick or TV show that they just didn’t do a good job of mixing the voices, and the dialog is “buried” by all the other stuff going on in the other channels.

    Just keep track of your reference setting and put it back where it’s supposed to be after you’re done with that viewing.

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  5. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

    Joined:
    May 22, 1999
    Messages:
    5,182
    Likes Received:
    0
    There ARE some movies I have to up the center volume as well.

    But sometimes this has been because the center speaker is simply sitting on the TV or pushed back or fireing over the heads of the listeners.

    Try a laser-pen on top of the center speaker to see where the center is really pointing. Rubber door wedges are a cheap way to make feet and give you some downward tilt.

    Also, pull the center speaker forward so it over hangs the face of the TV by about 1/4 inch. This prevents the face of the TV from acoustically coupling to the speaker.

    Then use the laser pointer to see where the L/R speakers are focused at. There are 3 popular ammounts of toe-in for the L/R speakers:
    • A - Focus 1-2 feet in front of the primary listener (this is the traditional 2-channel music alignment).
    • B - Focus exactly on the primary listener.
    • C - Focus 1-2 feet behind the primary listener.

    IMPORTANT: After playing with alignments be sure to use an SPL meter to re-adjust the levels. It's shocking how different the volume can be with a small change in speaker angle.

    Andre, try option C from above. Having the center speaker directed at your head, but the L/R speakers focusing behind you may help emphasize the center and keep the L/R speakers from swamping out the dialog.

    Hope this helps.
     

Share This Page