Center Channel on top of TW40X81

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Chris S, Jul 7, 2001.

  1. Chris S

    Chris S Cinematographer

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    Well I just finished upgrading my speakers by purchasing a Paradigm CC-370 which now sits on top of my Toshiba TW40X81 and I am a bit concerned. The speaker weights 25 lbs. and I am worried that the top of the set might begin to buckle under the added weight. I would move it out in front of the set (on a speaker stand or something) but I don't have enough room. Has anyone else had a large speaker on top of their set and did it do any damage? Also is there anything that I might be able to do to spread the weight out across the set? Chris
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    Home Theater: http://www.ig-88.net
     
  2. Ryan Pream

    Ryan Pream Stunt Coordinator

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    I wouldn't set ANY center channel on the TW40X81. The top is too thin and fragile. I built a shelf that mounts on the back wall.
    I have zero DIY skills so if I could manage it anyone can. I used a precut 14x36 piece of pine and two shelf braces from Lowes. Just make sure you mount each brace into a stud. I even stained the wood and mounted a florescent backlight under it. It looks very attractive.
    Ryan
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  3. Derek Bang

    Derek Bang Stunt Coordinator

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    I posted this a while back and few people used it with success. I switched my TW40X81 for a 40H80 and it works perfectly:
    If you are interested in an easy-to-make and nice looking stand for your center speaker over a TW40X81, below are some instructions. I based what I did on a picture from Stacey Spears’ TW40X81 review, except my TW40X81 sits on the Toshiba manufactured stand, which raises is about 9” higher than the one in the review picture. I hope to post pictures once my loft is finished.
    Materials needed:
    One ¾” thick 4’x8’ sheet of MDF (~$40)
    Two 8’ strips of ¾” panel molding (~$3)
    #4 Nails
    Brads
    4 L-brackets with 5/8” screws ($2)
    Wood Glue
    Wood Putty
    Mitre Saw ($7 at Lowe’s)
    A level
    Can of black paint ($6)
    Instructions:
    ·Have the hardware store/lumber yard cut the MDF into the following sized pieces:
    252 ¼” x 18 5/8” boards for the sides (shorter if you use a non-Toshiba stand or no stand), we’ll call them Boards A & B
    139 5/8” x 18 5/8” board for the top, call it Board C
    138 1/8” x 10” board for the back (just along the top for extra support), call it Board D
    ·Using the #4 nails and wood glue, attach Board C to the ends of Boards A & B
    ·Board D should fit just inside the frame, between A & B and up against C at the top of the frame. This board should be glued and nailed to the upper back of the frame to add a little support to the top board and too keep from swaying too much. It is a very tall and wide frame, so it still won’t be super sturdy. Nail through A, B, and C into board D. D should be flush with the back of the frame, the advantage of which is the appearance is more professional.
    ·Use the L-brackets to support the attachment of A & B to C. Don’t drill holes for the screws; just screw them in. Space them underneath C to spread the support, but keep at least 4 inches from the front.
    ·Use the wood putty to cover the nails and any chips/spaces that need to be smoothed out. Wait 15 minutes and sand the putty for smoothness.
    ·Cut the panel mold with the mitre saw at 45 degree cuts. This will go along the front of the frame. Without the panel mold, the unfinished ends of the MDF would be exposed and look bad when painted. Two of the panel mold strips should be 53” long and the strip along the top should be 39 5/8” long. Carefully cut them at 45 degrees at the ends where they meet so that it looks continuous around the edges. Mount the panel mold with wood glue underneath and small brads. Use putty to fill in any nail holes or empty spaces. Sand for smoothness.
    ·Last step. I used flat black paint and rolled it on. One coat was sufficient. I imagine spray paint would work fine too; depends on your paint supplies on hand. Rolling on the paint may look better. A tray, roller, and small brush is pretty cheap and can be used in the future if you don’t have the equipment currently.
    The frame should fit nicely around the TV with a ¼” or so space in between. My wife and I were stunned at how great it looks/works. I was worried about the weight of my center speaker (Paradigm CC-350, about 25 lbs.) bowing the screen, and it certainly does the trick. Plus, it looks like a nice store-bought cabinet and adds to the ambiance of my little home theater.
    I have very little wood-working experience, so I imagine about anyone can do this project. It took me 6 or 7 hours to do. I don’t have a table saw, so I had Lowes do the cuts for me, which made the project pretty easy. Here’s the site I based mine off of:
    http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...tv-3-2000.html
    Post any questions you have about this below and I’ll check back to see if I can be of assistance.
    Good luck, and I hope this helps somebody.
     
  4. Pete Jennings

    Pete Jennings Second Unit

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    Try clicking on the following URL: http://www.hometheaterspot.com/ubb/F...ML/000917.html and looking for CraigM's two posts regarding his TV wall mount. It is actually Lowe's that carries it, not Home Depot though. I bought one Thursday and installed it per his instructions. It looks great!!!!
    Good luck!
    Pete
     
  5. Chris S

    Chris S Cinematographer

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    Thanks for all of the help guys I really appreciate it. I like the way that CraigM's speaker looks over the set but I am weary of drilling screws into the speaker. It looks like my best alternative is to built the shelf around the set. Thanks again, Chris
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    Home Theater: http://www.ig-88.net
     
  6. Gregory Pauswinski

    Gregory Pauswinski Supporting Actor

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    You can also build a shelf that fits into the square holes on the back of the TV. A wooden dowel will fit perfectly into the hole and you can attach a piece of wood to it. It's a bit tricky getting the edge of the shelf cut to match the angle of the back of the TV. Mine doesn't quite match but you can't really tell.
    Gregory
     

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