Ceiling Construction?

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Dillon*G, Oct 4, 2006.

  1. Dillon*G

    Dillon*G Second Unit

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    I'm sorry if this has been asked before but i'm thinking about building a new home theater system and I was wondering if how the ceiling was placed made a difference. For example, flat, diagonal, or other ways.
     
  2. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    I’d say slanted or cathedral. IMO the fewer parallel surfaces you have, the better.
    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  3. homthtr

    homthtr Supporting Actor

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    Are you Drywalling, Drop Ceiling, or ??? What about the Floor? Floors seem to get more people in trouble than the ceiling. Walls can also be a big factor. Reflection points etc. All depends on how "audiophile" you want to get!.
     
  4. Dillon*G

    Dillon*G Second Unit

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    Planning on drywalling. In the things I wish i'd done differently thread people said they would put down wood floors so i'm leaning toward that. Also, is there an ideal height that a room should be? And any suggestions on the walls would be helpful,too.
     
  5. Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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    Well, I’ve always liked the cathedral ceilings we had in everyplace we’ve lived. The sound has a lot more time to diffuse and spread out before it gets up there, so by the time it reflects from the ceiling the sound is better dispersed and at a lower level, dB-wise. To me it just opens up the sound more when it’s not bouncing right off a low, flat ceiling right to your listening position, know what I mean?

    With carpeting and a cathedral ceiling, once we moved in all the furnishings we always had a fairly dead room. Our new place, by comparision, we put in a wood floor. It’s tolerable, but definitely it’s noticeably more "live."

    Regards,
    Wayne A. Pflughaupt
     
  6. Dillon*G

    Dillon*G Second Unit

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    Thanks for telling me about the wood floors. Either I read it wrong or the people didn't mind echoing.
     
  7. homthtr

    homthtr Supporting Actor

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    I believe that Dillon was refering to laying a wood under layment over the cement basement floor before laying carpet. vers laying carpet directly on the cement floor. Correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  8. Dillon*G

    Dillon*G Second Unit

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    I guess that it was they meant. I got confused when they said they wish they put wood floors down. Now it makes more sense.
     
  9. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

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    Greets!

    Ideally you want to mimic a full size cinema's layout, so you'd build a room-within-a-room with the sides and ceiling sloping away from the screen wall like a linear expansion horn except that due to its acoustically small volume WRT the soundtrack's BW, the rear wall needs to peaked to break up the room's main eigenmodes (standing waves). To further improve its LF response/acoustic attenuation, these surfaces should be made to act as bass absorbers and the surrounding cavities filled with high R insulation.

    With sloped surfaces, the room doesn't need to conform to a golden or acoustic ratio like a rectangular one, but a fixed ceiling height in an existing room will limit screen size/number of seating rows. For example, a 13' x 20' x 8' room will be limited to a ~9'-8" wide x 4'-8" ! high screen wall, so its length would need to be reduced to 10' (which would be further reduced by the peaked rear wall or other diffusor option) just to get it up to ~6'-4" x 11'-4" wide, fine for a single row 'intimate' HT with a 42" plasma, but for most existing rooms an acoustically effective sloped full length ceiling isn't a viable option and why acoustic tile, suspended absorbers or similar are the norm.

    There's other options of course, such as sloping just the first 10' in this example to get a bigger screen and at least the first row inside the sound 'cone', letting the second row act as eigenmode dampers [​IMG], with just an acoustic tile/whatever ceiling over the rear 10'.

    GM
     
  10. homthtr

    homthtr Supporting Actor

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