CD Recorder with Mic Input

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Philip, Aug 18, 2001.

  1. Philip

    Philip Extra

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    My wife is planning on cutting a CD of her music (keyboard + voice) ane while we have a demo done at a studio, we might want to make some changes and add tracks.
    Can anyone of us recommend a CDR which can add her voice to a CD containing her songs or simultaneously record/mix her piano and voice??
    Phil
     
  2. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    This is not possible. The best you can do is use some kind of computer recording device. I recommend Cakewalk Home Studio for this kind of work. You'll want a good mic and mic preamp as well as some kind of compression tool.
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    Philip Hamm
    AIM: PhilBiker
     
  3. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    I would use a mixer. A basic one like the ones RadioShack carries would work well for this. Connect a CD player and a mic (or two) to the inputs on the mixer. Connect the output to the CD-R deck. Also connect a pair of headphones for monitoring. The mixer will combine the signals (you adjust each source's level on the mixer) and output the mixed signal to the recorder.
    Most mixers also have mic preamps built in.
    I would use CD-RW discs since it may take more than one "take" to get it right. [​IMG]
    KJP
    [Edited last by Kevin P on August 20, 2001 at 09:08 AM]
     
  4. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Phil,
    I would concur with Philip Hamm!
    Your best bet would be to procure a basic "home studio" program like Cakewalk Sonar, Home Studio or Pro Audio. This software would cost you the same as a CD Recorder (under $200) and if you add a cheap radio shack mixer and cd burner to your computer, you'll never need to go back to that demo studio again!
    There are even a few multitrack free/shareware programs available out there:
    Ecasound http://www.wakkanet.fi/~kaiv/ecasound/
    AIM: VinceMaskeeper
    Interested in moving into FRONT PROJECTION with huge 6-10 foot widescreen? Buy my whole HDTV-ready CRT based front projection system delivered, cheap! Click here
    [Edited last by Vince Maskeeper on August 20, 2001 at 11:49 AM]
     
  5. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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    When I say "compression tool" I mean audio compression not digital data compression. Something like an Alesis Nano Compressor (I would recommend this exact model - about $120 at a local music store) would be perfect. A radio shack mixer would have a sufficient mic preamp.
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    Philip Hamm
    AIM: PhilBiker
     
  6. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    And again my moderating audio brother Philip is essentially correct- however if you're looking for a place to cut a corner and save a few bucks, you could do it here.
    Don't get me wrong, a decent audio compressor to run inline between your radio shack mixer and a computer would be a really good idea. This would help control dynamics, smooth over problems (especially associated with cheaper microphones like Shure SM58), and give an overall more pleasing recording.
    HOWEVER...
    Two major issue arise when discussing this:
    1) The Alesis Nano compressor is not what one would call a great compressor. It certainly works, and does a fine job for a $100 comp... however is certainly is not what anyone would mistake for transparent and not what I would call overly smooth when compared to even a entry level DBX (or even the Berringer stuff).
    2) Although there is no substitute for the sound of audio compression in the analog realm, in line, to tape-- if you work at it a little, post compression in the digital realm can do a pretty good job for demo type recording. I have actually been experimenting with some filters today using Soundforge/Sonar to mix a demo for a metal band who had no money to spend, and I'm pleasantly suprised by the results!
    If the material is simply for "demo" quality, and isn't too insane in dynamic range, you can track to computer, raw using a basic microphone (I would use a homemade pop filter if you have any pantyhose laying around) and just watch your headroom...
    Then run a mild compression filter on the track and experiment- and you'll probably find a pretty good result.
    Also, since you already recorded some tracks in the studio, I assume you're just adding backing vox and additional piano tracks to mixed material- in which case a compressor would probably be even less of an issue.
    Not saying "skip a compressor all together", they are important tools... rather I'm it's obvious you're on a budget so if you have to skimp somewhere- that's where I would skimp.
    I would say that post production compression and a little bit of trickery in recording and you could be fine skipping a compressor and spending the few extra dollars on a decent microphone to have a round the house (I recommend the AKG C3000 as an excellent, budget, all-around nice sounding condenser microphone!! However it requires phantom power, so make sure th console/preamp you buy has phantom power for mics).
    -Vince
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    http://www.musicianassist.com
    AIM: VinceMaskeeper
    Interested in moving into FRONT PROJECTION with huge 6-10 foot widescreen? Buy my whole HDTV-ready CRT based front projection system delivered, cheap! Click here
     

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