CD-R/CD-R Digital Audio question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Dave Poehlman, Feb 10, 2003.

  1. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    I have a Phillips CD recorder that was given to me from a coworker. Up until a few days ago, I'd only been using it as a cd player since I have a CD-RW on my PC for making CD's.

    However, I thought it might be fun to record some audio from those music channels on my cable service. Anyway, I drop a CD-R in the player and it doesn't recognize the disc.

    After reading the manual (usually the last resort for me [​IMG]), I can only use CD-R's with this logo:

    [​IMG]


    What is the ultimate difference between these disks and regular CD-R's with this logo?

    [​IMG]

    Just curious.
     
  2. Brian Ruth

    Brian Ruth Supporting Actor

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    Dave:

    Actually, I think the Digital Audio just stands for standard PCM CD Audio (44.1kHz, 16 Bit, 1411kbps), as opposed to computer data. I'm not really sure if there's any other difference.


    Special caveat: if you're using a component-style (i.e. standalone, dual-tray) recorder, you need to purchase AUDIO CD-Rs instead of normal (Data) CD-Rs. The difference is that Audio CD-Rs are specifically designed for the dual-tray, component style recorders, carry a small watermark, and have a slight price increase over their Data CD-R counterparts as a concession to the RIAA. Just make sure the CD-Rs you buy indicate Music (like these) instead of normal (data) CD-Rs.

    Hope that helps! [​IMG]
     
  3. Philip Hamm

    Philip Hamm Lead Actor

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  4. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    So, really, there is no difference in the actual CD construction... other than some hidden coding that tells the stand-alone recorder I've paid a little more per disk so some $ can be shovelled to the RIAA.

    Now I don't feel so bad recording music knowing some of my $ will go to the RIAA and eventually make its way to the artists themselves. [​IMG]
     
  5. Brian Ruth

    Brian Ruth Supporting Actor

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    Quoth the Dave:


    I hope you're kidding, Dave. There's no evidence to suggest that the money that goes to the RIAA from licensing fees actually ever goes to the artists themselves.

    Of all the profits on a CD, approximately $1 (sometimes less) goes to the artist. Couple that with the fact that record companies often charge the band for studio time, tour costs, and other various things, and its clear that the artists are getting the short end of the stick.

    So, at MOST, 1/15th of that fee you pay will go to artists. More likely, none of it goes to the artists and all of it goes to the RIAA to spend money on bigger guns to shoot itself in the foot with.... but I digress. [​IMG]
     
  6. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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