CD Bruning problem

Discussion in 'Computers' started by Dan Mertz, Dec 19, 2004.

  1. Dan Mertz

    Dan Mertz Stunt Coordinator

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    I just burned some music onto a CD and when I played it on a couple of different CD players each song tuns into static/noise, then eventually stops, about half way through the song. I listened to the actual files on my computer before I burned them to a CD and the sounded fine the whole way through. Was there a problem with the proccess of burning to the CD or could it be a defective CD? The CDs are "Memorex Music CD-Rs"...I haven't had problems with them before.
     
  2. Christian Behrens

    Christian Behrens Supporting Actor

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    What happens when you listen to the CD in your computer?

    -Christian
     
  3. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    Any particular reason you are using "Music CD-R's"?

    If the file plays fine on the PC and the burned disc does not, then you have a burn problem. Is this a new CD-Burner? Does it have burn-proof? Are you doing other tasks while burning? Are you using Windows Media Player to burn?

    C. Ryan
     
  4. Dan Mertz

    Dan Mertz Stunt Coordinator

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    I listened to the CD on my computer and the songs sound fine. I tried again on the CD players and I get the same problem. I am having the problem on two different CD players, and I have played other CD that I have burned on these CD players without any problems. The fact that the CD plays fine on my computer has me even more confused. Any ideas why this is happening?
     
  5. Dan Mertz

    Dan Mertz Stunt Coordinator

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    CRyan,

    I'm new to this, so I'm not sure what else to use. What should I be using instead of CD-Rs?

    To answer the rest of your questions...The CD burner is about 2 years old, but I'm just now starting to use it to burn music files. I have used it to burn data before. And I'm not sure what "burn-proof" is so I would guess the answer is "no" it does not have it. I was not doing any other tasks while burning, and I used Roxio Easy CD-Creator...which has worked fine before.

    Know that I've determined that the CD plays fine on my computer but not 2 different CD players, does it still sound like a burn problem? If it does then I will try it again on another CD.
     
  6. Mike Fassler

    Mike Fassler Supporting Actor

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    what model is the burner? also try using nero to burn your cd's and just use regular CD-R's no need for "music CD-R's" also list your pc specs the burner is in.
     
  7. ScottHH

    ScottHH Stunt Coordinator

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    Roxio's website has some recommendations as to how to use the software. Their instructions are different for audio and data discs?

    "A Record CD Setup dialog will come up. Click on options on the bottom right hand corner. This will give you your options on how you would like to record your disk. We recommend using the Disk-At-Once option for audio, and Track-At-Once for data."
     
  8. Dan Mertz

    Dan Mertz Stunt Coordinator

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    The burner is a SAMSUNG CDRW/DVD SM-332B.



    I used the Track-at-once option, however that is what I've used in the past. That could be the problem.
     
  9. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    My understanding is that "Music CD-R"s are CD-Rs with a higher price tag, to take advantage of the ignorant (no insult, just meaning you're just now learning about such things).

    You can use your Music CD-Rs, and when you run out, just buy cheap generic CD-Rs. I use some cheapies I picked up to make copies of my CDs for my car.

    "Burn-Proof" refers to a hardware feature CD writers came out with a few years back. Basically, it makes sure that the writing process doesn't get interrupted, producing bad discs. Your PC is new enough that the CD drive should have this feature. Make sure your writing software has the feature enabled. The name will vary, but it will indicate burn-proof or buffer underflow protection.

    But that's all I can offer. I don't know what might cause a CD to play on the computer but not in a regular CD player.
     
  10. Dan Mertz

    Dan Mertz Stunt Coordinator

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    Roxio CD Creator does have the buffer-underrun feature enabled.

    One last question before I try to make a new copy...I burned the CD at my drive's fastest speed (32x). Since then I went into the drive's properties and set it's write speed to 16x. Then when I go into Roxio, the last option screen that appears before the copying begins says that the write speed for this copy will be 32x, and it won't let me change it...even though I've already changed the setting in the drive itself. Is it going to write at the 32x speed Roxio is claiming or the 16x speed my drive is set to?
     
  11. Jordan_Brulotte

    Jordan_Brulotte Stunt Coordinator

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    May I ask if you burned the cd as an "audio" cd or a "data" cd? If you burnt music files onto the cd as "data" then a normal cd player will not recognize it and play it as garbled noises and static. The fact that the cd will play in the computer leads me to believe this is what you may have mistakingly done. A computer can read both data and audio cds and play them with no noticeable difference.

    Oh and as someone noted above, try disc at once and close the session. This prevents anything else from being added onto the cd in the future, but it finalizes the cd, which I have found helps a lot with audio cds.
     
  12. Mike Fassler

    Mike Fassler Supporting Actor

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    I see one issue it could be if its not any of the above, your running winXP on 256 megs of ram and trying to burn discs, you may not have much memory left for a buffer hence your bad burns.
     
  13. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    You specifically mention Memorex.

    This is a brand I've occasionally had a problem with (and there have been discusssions here about it), and I occasionally would have tracks with static, and with wierd jumps, ie, to music from another track.

    Perhaps you can try to burn the same track list to another brand cd-r?

    I have a version of Nero lite, and it defaults to the highest write-speed the brand of cd-r permits, but I always change it to the lowest speed, usually 8 x.

    As for the Music CD-R type of disk, my understanding is that these are required for stand alone audio component recorders, and are not meant for computer based burning. I guess yours are opened, maybe you should just give them to someone with a stand alone burner.

    On the other hand, since the process has worked for you before, perhaps the problem is something else altogether.
     
  14. Ken Chui

    Ken Chui Supporting Actor

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    Dan:

    After a preliminary check on the capabilities of your CDRW/DVD drive, it seems that this particular drive has a problem with extracting audio, i.e. generated multiple errors during the extraction process; such errors show up as hisses or pops during playback on the recorded disc.

    Have you updated the firmware on your drive? Firmware updates allow your drive to increase its compatibility with more media, as well as improve the functionality of certain features.

    As mentioned previously, it could be the media. Try using data CD-Rs as opposed to music CD-Rs, if for no other reason than their being cheaper (blank music CD-Rs are intended for use in a stand-alone audio CD recorder, but aren't better or worse than blank data CD-Rs). Use a program such as Nero InfoTool or CD-R Identifier v1.6.3 to identify the manufacturer of your CD-R, type of dye used in the CD-R (some drives are more sensitive to certain dyes than others), the firmware version of your drive (may need to flash your drive with a firmware patch), etc.

    Seeing as your drive has an 8MB buffer, even though you're running WinXP on only 256MB RAM, the sizeable buffer should minimize problems such as buffer underruns.

    I would strongly recommend ditching Roxio for Nero v5 or v6. Roxio is a horrendous program that doesn't do any one thing well, be it ripping, writing, etc. (based on my personal experience with the software on an old Philips CD-RW drive). You should be able to get hold of a full, functional copy of v5 for under $10 shipped via eBay (I can sell you my copy for less, as I'm running v6 on my home and work PCs [​IMG] ).
     
  15. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

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    This is getting confusing...

    Two things you should make sure of first and try again.

    1. Burn as a Music CD and not DATA. The music CD-R's should be fine btw.

    2. Next, find out how to make it burn at a lower speed. I would try 8X to start. It is a common problem for CD's burned at higher speeds not to be recognized by standalone players. I cannot help you with this as I have not used ROXIO for 5 years.
     
  16. Dan Mertz

    Dan Mertz Stunt Coordinator

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    Are there any good FREE programs out there?
     
  17. Dan Mertz

    Dan Mertz Stunt Coordinator

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    I ran "CD Identifier" and found out the following:

    ATIP: 97m 26s 66f
    Disc Mfg: CMC Magnetics Corp.
    Recording Layer: Dye(Short stratety; e.g. Phthalocynine)

    Of course, I don't know what any of this means.
     
  18. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    I had burned well over 30 disks on Memorex, and had noticed several problems. Then I started to find threads here and by Googling where some people were finding Memorex in particular unreliable. (Tho many people stated they had no problem.)

    Have recaptured most of those burns on Verbatim, which seemed to be more highly regarded.

    PS One source of some significant problems for me has been "Low Resources", so I've found it wise to always reboot before attempting a burn.
     
  19. Dan Mertz

    Dan Mertz Stunt Coordinator

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    I burned the CD again at 8x speed and had better luck. I will continue to use these Memorex for data and music and then try a different brand. If I continue to have problems until then, I will try using something other than Roxio.
     
  20. Keith Paynter

    Keith Paynter Screenwriter

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    Dave, these discs are used specifically for standalone consumer CD Recorder decks. You cannot use them in computer CD-R's for data storage, only Audio CD's. The higher price tag is for music royalties, since it is assumed end users are duplicating copyrighted recordings. Also, since there are fewer of these manufactured vs. the millions/billions of data CD-R's, their initial cost are higher.

    Memorex CD-R's have been problematic, I prefer Fuji discs, however I'm not a fan of lime-green dye CD-R's - don't leave them data side up exposed to UV light (sunlight or indoor) or you'll find they turn brown and eventually your data will be lost forever. Verbatim's dark blue discs are probably the best but they're still expensive.
     

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