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Dave Scarpa

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so I can understand cbs’s reluctance to bring out or finish some series on dvd but why aren’t they on all access? Besides discovery being a draw why not all seasons of Beverly hillbillies or petticoat junction? Why isn’t past dvd shows like Mannix the fugitive, or have gun will travel there, or all seasons of Bonanza? C’mon cbs your sitting on a ton of content I’ll give you $6 a month forever if you put it online
 

Harry-N

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I've wondered that too. It seems like it would be a natural place for all of that great CBS product.

Something I've noticed is that the product that IS there, is mostly also available on Amazon Prime. Shows like the STAR TREKs, the MISSION: IMPOSSIBLES, I LOVE LUCY, etc. CBS All Access has HAWAII FIVE-O, which I'm happy about as I never delved into those DVD sets.

I wonder if they are giving another segment of time to see how many of the "COMPLETE" DVD sets they've repackaged will sell. After that, perhaps they'll shunt that product to All Access.
 

Cranston37+

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Is it possible they don’t have the rights to do so? Mannix and The Fugitive are on DVD through Paramount...
 

Brian Kidd

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Indeed. Just because a show aired on CBS doesn't mean they own it. With that said, they do own an awful lot that they aren't making available. It could be that they've licensed out the titles to other entities and so aren't able to include it on AllAccess at this point in time. That's likely one reason why Disney is waiting to launch their own service until their current contracts with Hulu and Netflix expire. People are going to get fed up with having to pay for so many different streaming services, though. Part of the appeal of cord cutting is paying less than cable.
 

Harry-N

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People are going to get fed up with having to pay for so many different streaming services, though.

But that's the way of the world, based on the few models we have. I remember back in the late '70s into the early '80s when cable was just coming into its own in areas that had adequate over-the-air TV. Up to then, cable was considered "Community Antenna TV", where an area that wasn't well-served by over the air (rural or mountainous areas) hooked up a giant antenna and distributed those signals via coax to the customers for a nominal fee.

Then along came HBO as an added pay service promising recent movie hits uninterrupted by commercials and all language included - quite a novelty for most at that time. HBO had, at that time, access to virtually every movie coming out of Hollywood, both old and new, and provided them on their schedule. If you had HBO, you knew that your favorite recent movie would show up on its schedule within months of leaving the theaters.

That was perfect for just about everyone. But it wasn't to be forever. Not content to let HBO have the whole pie to themselves, upstart pay services began showing up - Showtime, Spotlight, etc. And these got to be household names by offering "exclusive" movie showings of certain titles from certain studios that signed exclusive deals with those services, shutting HBO out.

Now, to get all of the big hits, you needed two or more services to get everything. (In Philly, a local pay service called PRISM offered all of the movies and a lot of local sports, competing well with both HBO and SHOWTIME.)

Today, the big successful giant is Netflix. It's had its moment in the sun and got everyone to accept streaming as a way of life. Now others want a piece of that pie and are starting competing streaming services, and just as in the old days, certain studios are going to go to certain streaming services or start their own.

It's one of those "be careful what you wish for" scenarios. For years, cable subscribers bitched and moaned about having too many junk channels that they were essentially paying for and wishing they could pick and choose their own choices. Well, the future is here - you get to choose which "pay" services you want to subscribe to. And don't be too surprised to find that someday you'll be paying as much or more for your choices as you did with a one-size-fits-all cable service.
 

Brian Kidd

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It's one of those "be careful what you wish for" scenarios. For years, cable subscribers bitched and moaned about having too many junk channels that they were essentially paying for and wishing they could pick and choose their own choices. Well, the future is here - you get to choose which "pay" services you want to subscribe to. And don't be too surprised to find that someday you'll be paying as much or more for your choices as you did with a one-size-fits-all cable service.
Except I don't think we will. Younger people have grown accustomed to instant gratification and "one-stop shopping." We'll definitely see a rise in the number of streaming services for the near future, but I truly believe that they will eventually consolidate into just a few. Amazon and Hulu are already acting as kinds of hubs where you can add on packages like HBO, Showtime, and other specialized programming. I'm okay with that. I'll still end up being able to only pay for the services I'll utilize, but will be able to access them from a central location. It's essentially the a la carte programming that people have wanted for some time. I have no doubt that prices will rise from what they currently are, but we won't, in theory, have to deal with content providers getting into spats with cable or DirecTV and blacking out their content. Let's face it. They Internet has shown that, if people want to see certain films or TV shows, they're willing to pay reasonable prices for them to watch them legally. If they aren't available legally, people still find a way to watch them. Content providers won't have quite the unchecked power that they have with cable and satellite. It is to their benefit to provide legal methods of watching at reasonable costs.
 

Mark Booth

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There's plenty of old CBS content on Hulu. CBS should put everything else there and collect some dollars from more of their products. No way in holy hell am I subscribing to an individual network's digital streaming service unless the subscription fee is down around $1 a month. Particularly when I get the local CBS affiliate over-the-air for free (in superb quality).

I support the idea of letting us subscribe to individual channels but not for $8 a month each. Cable TV would be cheaper and it's not cheap.

The ONLY thing on CBS All Access that I would want to watch is the new ST Discovery. I'll eventually get to watch it some other way.

Mark
 
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