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Captain from Castile Blu-ray (1 Viewer)

RobertMG

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This BD is much better than the DVD, one of my favorite Power titles. Still don't know why this and Capt. from Castile are not been restored and BD'ed. But this French BD, while not a full restoration, some work must have been done becuase it is hands and fists over the older DVD that I had. So until this is given the love that it eserves, this BD is definatly a step up!!!
Years ago the SFM holiday network aired the best print of Captain From Castille wonder what happened to it?
 

Capt D McMars

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Years ago the SFM holiday network aired the best print of Captain From Castille wonder what happened to it?
Warners did release a decent dvd, but you could tell no real restoration was done...but the dvd was better than the vhs was...
 

RobertMG

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Are you sure? Are you confusing with Prince of Foxes?
 

RMajidi

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Are you sure? Are you confusing with Prince of Foxes?
Prince of Foxes was Kino.



1668383445544.jpeg
 

RobertMG

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Prince of Foxes was Kino.



View attachment 162311

Captain From Castile - Twilight Time [1947] Blu-ray​

Format: Blu-ray
4.5 out of 5 stars 232 ratings

IMDb6.8/10.0







$39.95$39.95

































U can still get it on Amazon!


Additional Blu-ray optionsEditionDiscsPrice
New fromUsed from

Blu-rayLimited Edition1$34.99
$27.96$29.99

Blu-ray1$39.95
$29.99$49.99
 

Robert Harris

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Captain from Castile cannot be fully restored. Best possibility might be to scan a later dye transfer print, but there is no proper restoration quality pre-print capable of returning it to its original form.
 

Robert Crawford

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Captain from Castile cannot be fully restored. Best possibility might be to scan a later dye transfer print, but there is no proper restoration quality pre-print capable of returning it to its original form.
Another Fox Technicolor film that's been compromised for home video due to some poor decision-making from Fox executives decades ago.
 

Nick*Z

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Yep, every time I settle in to watch a vintage Fox 'Technicolor' classic I am acutely aware of the obscenity Fox committed in the late 70's, junking millions of miles of original camera elements, merely to clear 'space' in their vaults for the future of their company. Ironically, with Fox's annexation into Disney, that future no longer exists. Even more tragically, neither does the studio's illustrious past!
 

Capt D McMars

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It was released on Blu-ray by Twilight Time.
that's the copy that I have, while better than the dvd, it is still in need for further restoration. I think like Imprint, they ran with what they were given.
 

RobertMG

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Captain from Castile cannot be fully restored. Best possibility might be to scan a later dye transfer print, but there is no proper restoration quality pre-print capable of returning it to its original form.
Any info on SFM Holiday Network? The print they aired was better than we see on video - would they have used the Studio Tech Print?
 

RobertMG

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THE Bosely Crowther in probably his worse review boy did he get it wrong! Readers of Samuel Shellabarger's spectacular "Captain from Castile" (which seemed, indeed, to have been written with the movies and Technicolor in view) will be distressed to discover a rather pastel reflection of the book in Twentieth Century-Fox's film version, which opened at the Rivoli yesterday. Blood, which flowed in such abundance through the notably action-crammed romance, is reduced to a few red trickles and sun-dried splashes in this strangely queasy film. The horror of the Spanish Inquisition, which was basic to the villainy in the book, is implied in a few mild arm-twistings and one brief torture-cry from off-stage. And the battles between the Spaniards and the Mexicans, which were violent and clanging in print, are conspicuously nonexistent on the gaudy but unexcited screen.Whether a meticulous deference to the Catholic Church and to our neighbors to the south occasioned elimination of the richest action in the book, it remains that the picture is neither good history nor top adventure-romance. It is a long and peculiarly disjointed report on a bold young Spaniard's life, from his bland youth in sixteenth-century Castile to his soldiering inMexico with Cortez. And although it does have some fast cape-slinging, sword-drawing and chases on horse and foot, plus a share of love-making al fresco, it lacks direction and suspense. Too much attention is given to undramatic intrigue.Indifferent, too, are the performances. Tyrone Power makes a handsome Spanish blade, but with little temper in his mettle, and Cesar Romero makes an uninspired Cortez, while Jean Peters is lukewarm as a slavey and Lee J. Cobb is windy as a buccaneer. Ten or twelve other actors inflate their costumes elaborately but they become little more than added gadgets on a big assembly-line-produced display.
 

RobertMG

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THE Bosely Crowther in probably his worse review boy did he get it wrong! Readers of Samuel Shellabarger's spectacular "Captain from Castile" (which seemed, indeed, to have been written with the movies and Technicolor in view) will be distressed to discover a rather pastel reflection of the book in Twentieth Century-Fox's film version, which opened at the Rivoli yesterday. Blood, which flowed in such abundance through the notably action-crammed romance, is reduced to a few red trickles and sun-dried splashes in this strangely queasy film. The horror of the Spanish Inquisition, which was basic to the villainy in the book, is implied in a few mild arm-twistings and one brief torture-cry from off-stage. And the battles between the Spaniards and the Mexicans, which were violent and clanging in print, are conspicuously nonexistent on the gaudy but unexcited screen.Whether a meticulous deference to the Catholic Church and to our neighbors to the south occasioned elimination of the richest action in the book, it remains that the picture is neither good history nor top adventure-romance. It is a long and peculiarly disjointed report on a bold young Spaniard's life, from his bland youth in sixteenth-century Castile to his soldiering inMexico with Cortez. And although it does have some fast cape-slinging, sword-drawing and chases on horse and foot, plus a share of love-making al fresco, it lacks direction and suspense. Too much attention is given to undramatic intrigue.Indifferent, too, are the performances. Tyrone Power makes a handsome Spanish blade, but with little temper in his mettle, and Cesar Romero makes an uninspired Cortez, while Jean Peters is lukewarm as a slavey and Lee J. Cobb is windy as a buccaneer. Ten or twelve other actors inflate their costumes elaborately but they become little more than added gadgets on a big assembly-line-produced display.
Variety GOT it right
Based on Samuel Shellaberger’s 1945 best-selling historical novel, the cinema adaptation hews closely to the structure of the book, capturing the vast sweep of its story and adding to it an eye-stunning Technicolor dimension. The coin poured into this production, reported to be around $4.5 million, is visible in every inch of the footage.


For this plume-and-sabre epic of 16th-century Spanish imperial conquerors, producer and production chief have assembled a group of thespers who are cleanly tailored for the various parts. Led by Tyrone Power, who’s rarely been shown to better advantage, the roster is buttressed by Cesar Romero, in a stirringly virile protrait of Cortez; Lee J Cobb, as a fortune hunter; John Sutton, as a velvety villain, and newcomer Jean Peters, a buxom, appealing wench for the romantic byplay.
From one viewpoint, this picture is constructed like a self-contained double feature. In the first half, the locale is Spain during the Inquisition, with Power and his family unjustly persecuted for heresy. Escaping from Spain, Power finds himself during the second half in Mexico as a recruit in Cortez’s expedition of plunder against the Aztec empire ruled by Montezuma.
There are, however several soft spots in the story that interfere with credibility. There is, for instance, the fact that Power narrowly escapes death no less than three times under the most extreme circumstances. Sutton, likewise, cheats death two times despite his being stabbed through the heart with a foot of steel one time and near-strangled the next.
1947: Nomination: Best Scoring of a Dramatic Picture

Captain from Castile​

 

David Weicker

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Any info on SFM Holiday Network? The print they aired was better than we see on video - would they have used the Studio Tech Print?
What evidence do you have that an SFM Holiday Network broadcast from over three decades ago was 'better'
 

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