Capote

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Dave Hackman, Nov 5, 2005.

  1. Dave Hackman

    Dave Hackman Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2000
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    This movie describes the events Truman Capote went through in order to write his first non-fiction book In Cold Blood. This book hit the stands in 1965 and allegedly caused quite a stir by delivering a captivating fiction-like account of an innocent family’s murder by two young ex-cons in search of hidden cash.

    I have never read the book, seen the movie or even heard of this person before seeing this film. That being said I had no problem enjoying this because Capote played by Philip Seymour Hoffman is such an eccentric interesting character. His voice is very unusual and does take some getting used to but after a while, it just becomes one of the many interesting traits that make him memorable.

    I am unable to tell whether this is a true representation of Capote but I can say that Phillip brings forth a character with many dimensions and moods, none of which ever give the impression of being phony or manufactured.

    Aside from Hoffman’s performance the creation of the novel is interesting to see unfold. Capote begins collecting data from the arresting police department with the help of his notoriety, which once exhausted leads to a personal relationship with one of the killers. Conflicts arise when Capote’s initial closeness becomes a disadvantage in his effort to finish his book and reestablish his sanity.

    B
     
  2. Nick C.

    Nick C. Second Unit

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2001
    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Interesting film, great to see Hoffman getting a starring role here and there. I'm glad this wasn't your traditional bio-pic, it was more akin to a psychological thriller

    Clifton Collins, the actor who played Perry Smith, was superb as well.
     
  3. Joe D

    Joe D Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 21, 1999
    Messages:
    838
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Man, I've watched the trailer about ten times for this movie and I really want to see it, but it is playing nowhere near me.

    Hoffman looks like he is doing a great job again.

    So I'm patiently waiting for the DVD.
     
  4. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    11,758
    Likes Received:
    671
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Since 2006
    Real Name:
    Cameron Yee
    Gonna go check it out after work today!
     
  5. Eric Peterson

    Eric Peterson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2001
    Messages:
    2,959
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I too want to see this badly. Is this ever going to be on more screens? It's only in 3 theaters in downtown Chicago right now. I understand that this won't get hundreds of screens around my area, but films of this size typically get 10-20 screens which means something within reasonable driving distance. Neither IMDB nor Fandango list anything about date for going wide, they simply say "Released September 30th"

    Meanwhile SAW2 is on a bazillion screens.[​IMG]
     
  6. Nathan V

    Nathan V Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2002
    Messages:
    960
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Outstanding film that should guarantee Hoffman an oscar. Starts out with several rather funny moments and a generally lighter tone before delving into deep psychological craziness. I don't know who the director is but he has a terrific compositional sense. Excellent portrait of a man and his book, and how the two work on each other. For some reason I also really loved Catherine Keener in this movie.
     
  7. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    11,758
    Likes Received:
    671
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Since 2006
    Real Name:
    Cameron Yee
    I don't live in a big town (about 140k), so I was honestly a bit surprised it made it here so quickly or as quickly as it took from me hearing about it to having it show up (about three weeks I think).
     
  8. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    11,758
    Likes Received:
    671
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Since 2006
    Real Name:
    Cameron Yee
    Well, for some of us the reason would be it's Catherine Keener! [​IMG]
     
  9. Ravi K

    Ravi K Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    Messages:
    707
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Saw this last week and thought it was an excellent film about Truman Capote's obsession with the Clutter murder story. He is fascinated for a few reasons, which I won't get into, since few people have seen it.

    Philip Seymour Hoffman (I almost wrote "Truman Capote") will get an Oscar nomination for sure. He's absolutely superb.
     
  10. Cameron Yee

    Cameron Yee Executive Producer
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Messages:
    11,758
    Likes Received:
    671
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Since 2006
    Real Name:
    Cameron Yee
    It took about three minutes for me to adjust to hearing that voice from Hoffman, but then it was smooth sailing.

    I think what was great about Catherine Keener's performance is that you can see where Atticus Finch and To Kill A Mockingbird came from based on it. Though not exactly Capote's "moral compass" she's often this silent presence of perspective and ethics. Yet it doesn't feel like she's judging him - even at one point when she makes an incredibly direct statement about his true motivations. If it hadn't been explained how the two met, one would wonder why or how they ever became friends.

    I've always enjoyed Hoffman's work, but this was just on another level.
     
  11. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    It's a classic "platform" release, relying on word-of-mouth. Right now it's in 183 theaters (according to Box Office Mojo). If it continues to perform well, look for a bigger expansion shortly (as with Shopgirl and Good Night, and Good Luck, both of which expanded hugely last weekend).

    The movie's a hard one to market, because (as exemplified by the first post in this thread) Capote is no longer the household name he once was. But Hoffman and Keener are magnificent (as is Chris Cooper, quietly brilliant as usual), and the subject matter is inherently fascinating, which is part of why Capote's book became such a huge success.

    I would have thought it impossible to find a "dark underbelly" to the pitch-black story of In Cold Blood, but this film manages to do it. I saw the film over a month ago, and I'm still thinking about some of the scenes between Capote and Perry, which are very disturbing.

    M.
     
  12. Eric Peterson

    Eric Peterson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2001
    Messages:
    2,959
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0


    Yeah, it just seems much slower to spread than other films of a similar nature, especially with all of the Oscar talk around Hoffman's performance.

    Oh well, maybe I'll have time to read the book "In Cold Blood" before I see this. I have a copy buried somewhere that I've never read.
     
  13. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I suspect the marketing guys are waiting for that to build a little more so that they can use it as the "hook" for wider advertising.

    M.
     
  14. Brett_M

    Brett_M Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2004
    Messages:
    1,397
    Likes Received:
    58
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    Mos Eisley Spaceport
    Real Name:
    Brett Meyer
    Saw it last night at the Main Art in Royal Oak, MI. Incredible. One of the most absorbing and facsinating performances I've ever seen. Brilliant.

    I loved its deliberate pace, script and direction. And the music was great, too.
     
  15. Eric Peterson

    Eric Peterson Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2001
    Messages:
    2,959
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, it finally made it to one theater outside of downtown Chicago, so I caught a late matinee on Friday.

    I knew very little of Truman Capote going into this film, except for the fact that he wrote "Breakfast at Tiffanys" & "In Cold Blood". The first half of the film moves very slowly but is filled with some great acting. (I have to admit to checking my watch regularly.) The final third of the movie really grabbed me though. This is definitely a film that I need a second viewing to completely comprehend. I picked up a paperback of "In Cold Blood", and will read that and check out the accompanying film before I rewatch this on DVD whenever it debuts.

    On a side note, I had no idea that there was a connection between Capote and Harper Lee. That really caught me offguard. Then I read something where there are some literary experts that think Capote wrote large portions if not all of "To Kill a Mockingbird". WOW!


    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  16. Craig S

    Craig S Producer
    Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2000
    Messages:
    5,780
    Likes Received:
    230
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    League City, Texas
    Real Name:
    Craig Seanor
    Capote also expanded in Houston this past weekend, and I barely caught a matinee yesterday (got caught in a massive traffic jam and reached the theater 10 minutes late; luckily (for me), they hadn't even started the previews yet).

    Hoffman, of course, is brilliant as Capote, and a lock for a Best Actor nomination. But beyond that, I feel the film itself is one of the best of the year, and is worthy of Oscar consideration for Best Picture, Director, Screenplay, Editing, Score, Supporting Actress (Keener), and Supporting Actor (Collins).

    There's apparently another Capote biopic in the works for next year. If I were that producer, I might just cut my losses and throw in the towel. I don't think it can be done any better than this film.
     
  17. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 1998
    Messages:
    31,340
    Likes Received:
    6,595
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Michigan
    Real Name:
    Robert

    The character of Dill from "To Kill a Mockingbird" is supposedly Truman Capote as a child. I hope to see this film this coming weekend.





    Crawdaddy
     
  18. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    6,531
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    0



    Yes, though aside from the fact that both Capote and Dill were undersized, effeminate, haughty, abandoned by their parents and forced to spend summers with two spinster aunts a couple doors down from Scout Finch's (aka Harper Lee's) childhood home in Alabama, the resemblance is quite shallow.[​IMG]

    The screenwriter for TKAM said that he tried to write the character of Dill as a young Capote when he adapted the screenplay. In the extras of the special edition, he said (paraphrasing) "I don't know if Truman was anything like that as a child, but I certainly hope he was".
     
  19. Richard Kim

    Richard Kim Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2001
    Messages:
    4,385
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0

    I would disagree with this. In the film, Capote didn't really think much of To Kill A Mockingbird. After watching the film's primiere, he says "I don't see what the all fuss is about", which I found pretty surprising.
     
  20. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    6,531
    Likes Received:
    15
    Trophy Points:
    0


    Although I never believed the extreme conspiracy theories behind Capote's "writing" of To Kill a Mockingbird (my personal opinion is that he helped edit the manuscript and declined any credit due to loyalty to his childhood friend), I can see the wry sarcasm of Capote saying exactly this about the film, even if he had written the entire book. Capote certainly had no use for Hollywood and/or the upper crust, and often satired them viciously (see Breakfast at Tiffanys). Yet at the same time he longed for and participated in the very excesses he lampooned. I find it very telling that he feels he must attend the lavish premier of a film adaptation of a Pulitzer Prize novel he was quite familiar with and yet he sarcastically belittles the whole thing with that dismissive quote. Typical Truman Capote.
     

Share This Page