Cannot delete file in Windows 2000 Pro

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Greg_Y, Dec 30, 2002.

  1. Greg_Y

    Greg_Y Screenwriter

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    This is the darndest problem. I think I have a corrupt NTFS file system but I'm not sure.
    My hard disc is partitioned into two drives: C and D. C is where the OS (Windows 2000 Pro with SP3) and program files are. D is where I keep my data. Over the weekend, I reformatted the C drive and reloaded Windows 2000. I then reloaded all the critical updates, etc and all of my program files. On the D drive, I have a directory with about 1.5 gigs of data (audio .wav files.) After reloading my OS, I burned the audio files to disc and now I cannot delete those files. When I try to delete a file, I get an error message saying "Cannot delete {filename}: Access is denied. The source file may be in use." I am the Administrator of the machine and the only other user is 'Guest' and that account is disabled.
    I tried shelling out to DOS (cmd) and deleting the files that way. I tried using dir/x to find the short name of the files and delete them that way. I tried booting in safe mode -- no dice. I searched using google and microsoft and couldn't find any other help.
    I noticed something fishy though and this is where someone may help. When I view the file properties and browse to the security tab, I get a message saying "You only have permission to view the current security information on {filename}." Then I see this:
    [​IMG]
    Those two users (S-1 ...) don't exist. At least, I can't find them. Where did they come from?
    Any ideas on how I can delete these files that I mysteriously lost permission to?
     
  2. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

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    When you reloaded your OS, it assigned new SIDs to your user accounts (including Administrator), so they no longer match the SIDs the permissions are assigned to on your D drive.

    What you need to do is take ownership of the files on your D drive (by clicking Advanced on the security tab, then click the Owner tab). Once Administrator takes ownership, you can change permissions. At that point add permissions for Administrator (or better yet, the Administrators group, or if you aren't concerned about security, the Everyone group). Once you do that, you should regain access to the files on your D drive. Once you have access, you can delete the permissions for the invalid SIDs you see.

    KJP
     
  3. Charles J P

    Charles J P Cinematographer

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    Kevin has it exactly right. Your files on the separate partition keep their permissions independant of your now-wiped-out OS. So, since your old Administrator ID was a local admin, your new one is two, as far as your PC is concerned maybe your new OS is actually another PC trying to connect and delete your files. Make sense?
     
  4. Greg_Y

    Greg_Y Screenwriter

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    You guys are the best! That worked! Thanks.
    Although I'm not sure why I haven't run into this before since I've reloaded my OS numerous time. Oh well, no biggie.
     
  5. Scott Rei

    Scott Rei Auditioning

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    If the drive was formatted with FAT32 instead of NTFS in your previous installations you wouldn't of had this issue. It only applies if you have NTFS file system.
     

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