Can you have a wireless and wired network?

Discussion in 'Computers' started by James_S, Jan 9, 2005.

  1. James_S

    James_S Second Unit

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    Just wondering if you can have a wireless and a wired network/dsl? Right now I have 3 computers (2 desktops & 1 laptop w/docking station) running through the wired router. I would like to use the laptop downstairs and in the bedroom sometimes but don’t want to run an ethernet cable 50’ +/- long to use the laptop. I have a wireless card for the laptop and before I go out and by a wireless router I wanted to run it by you guys first if it can be done.

    I was thinking the way to hook it up is to run the ethernet cable to the wireless router behind my existing router/firewall and I would think that would work..Maybe? If I am wrong any other suggestions? I really don't want to change everything to a wirelss system.

    Thanks in advance

    James
     
  2. Will.MA

    Will.MA Stunt Coordinator

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    Absolutely.

    1) It is perfectly plausible to implement a hybrid Ethernet/wireless local network. I use this setup at home to support a number of workstations, laptops, and PDAs with wired/wireless access.

    2) You are correct in assuming your AP would sit behind your existing hardware firewall/router. Assuming that your existing router assigns IP addresses using DHCP, your Ethernet router will assign an IP address to the wireless Access Point (you don't need an additional wireless router -- there is a difference) after which the AP can associate with your wireless notebook.

    A word of the wise: make sure at the very least you enable the WEP encryption on both your access point and each wireless client and customize the AP name so that it isn't "default." It is token prevention to stop snoopers from looking around inside your network free to wreak havoc.
     
  3. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
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    James:

    I am running a Linksys router/hub that enables me to do just want you are wanting to do. I have my daughter's PC upstairs and my ReplayTV units using the wireless side and my other two PC's in my office are wired directly to the router.

    Parker
     
  4. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    Though a wireless router isn't needed in this case, keep in mind that a wireless access point will be much more expensive and that a router can be set up to perform exactly like a WAP.
    You'll have to disable DHCP and may even have to change the IP address of the wireless router....they're usually set up as 192.168.1.xxx, which is on the same string as most broadband modem/routers. Many times this causes a conflict and it's necessary to change the wireless router IP address to a different string. All very easy changes, but just know that a router probably won't work right out of the box just to give wireless connectivity to an existing network.
     
  5. Will.MA

    Will.MA Stunt Coordinator

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    It appears that wireless APs and combo router/switches are nearly identical in price. This is odd because generally speaking, because APs have less intelligence than routers, they involve less circuitry and usually are not more expensive than the latter. For whatever reason, there seems to be a deeper market penetration of combo boxes than APs and I think the fierce competition for the home networking market has driven down router prices so much that APs and routers are now near the same price points.

    So, because that is the condition of the market, get an all in one box solution like Parker & I have that will be less confusing for you to use/setup in addition to being neater. Also, if you have only one printer, there's a good change that you could share printing access with your various computers by connecting the printer at the router instead of moving it from computer to computer. I recommend NewEgg.com as a retailer for you to start your planning/shopping as they have a large selection of products and an excellent reputation for service, prices, and fast shipping.

    I would pack away the wired router/switch that you have now. You'll never know when you'll need another four ports of connectivity. When that day comes, you'll have it covered.
     
  6. Joseph DeMartino

    Joseph DeMartino Lead Actor

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    I have almost exactly that set-up. I'm typing this from a laptop in my living room via a wireless link to my DSL/router. My TiVO is also connected to the network via wireless.

    Check with your DSL provider. I bought a wireless router and had trouble getting it to work with my existing DSL gatway, so I called tech support at BellSouth to see if they had any suggestions. They did: Return the router and get my money back, and let them ship me their combination DSL Gatway/wireless router which, with a one year extention on my DSL service, would cost me exactly nothing. I had the new gateway a couple of days later and the set up was a breeze. I haven't had any trouble since and the convenience is wonderful.

    Later,

    Joe
     
  7. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    That was probably a case of what I mentioned above. Bellsouth modems use 192.168.1.254 and most off the shelf routers use the exact same address so there's a conflict between the hardware....competing for the same IP so nothing past the new router will work. No connection for anybody. It's usually a simple fix of changing the IP in the new router, and turning off DHCP so you don't have 2 boxes trying to dole out IP's to your machines.
     
  8. James_S

    James_S Second Unit

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    Guys,

    Thanks very much for the answer that I was hoping to get. I will be hooking everything up this weekend and we will see how it goes. Again thanks for the help.

    James
     

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