Can Yamaha RX-V2092 be upgraded with 6-channel analog inputs?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Rob Sitze, Jul 25, 2002.

  1. Rob Sitze

    Rob Sitze Auditioning

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    I thought I saw a post a very long time ago where someone stated they had instructions to upgrade this older Yammy with 6 channel analog inputs. Any readers here have a copy or have a success story on this?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Mike Estoup

    Mike Estoup Auditioning

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    I would be interested in same. Also, is there a way to replace or add a decoder chip giving this unit DTS decoding capability without spending more than a new unit would cost?
     
  3. Geoff S

    Geoff S Stunt Coordinator

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    I took a look at the product manual http://www.yamaha.com/menuitems/manu...c/RX-V2092.pdf , there is no 6 channel external analog input on the back pannel, so therefore no upgradability with external decoders such as those for DTS 5.1. You should try to do a search for that post, but I doubt they were talking about the 2092... perhaps they meant the 2095.
    I'm not sure if this unit was ever even hardware upgradable, you could ask the Yamaha corporation, but I doubt it is, and even if it is the upgrade board for it would be extremely hard to find.
    Although you don't want to hear it, if you want more than Pro-Logic and Dolby Digital, the only way is going to be to get a new receiver, which since this model was introduced in 1997, have made leaps and bounds in the number of formats.
     
  4. Rob Sitze

    Rob Sitze Auditioning

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    More clearly, I was asking about the possibility of adding the analog inputs themselves, by tapping somewhere into the pre-amp stage and installing additional RCA jacks.
    The hint I got of this once before alluded to (but did not include) a wiring suggestion on where to actually tap into the system.
     
  5. jeff peterson

    jeff peterson Supporting Actor

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    I printed the instructions awhile back since I have the 2092 also (love it). I still haven't gotten the nerve to do it yet. Although with players with DTS decoding built in (which the 2092 doesn't have) coming down in price and DVD A/SACD on the scene...it's getting more tempting. Please let us know if it works for you. I'm curious how volume is controlled, must be from the source device.

    I'll type in the instructions here. They're lengthy so ignore the typos. Oh, and I take no responsibility for any damage this may cause or if it doesn't work.

    First, you need to open the receiver. Once open, you will see the pc board that the pre outs are mounted on. You will need to remove that board. Be sure to note any ribbon cables, wires, etc. Note their orientation on the pre out board.

    Then, take one pre out at a time and follow the following steps:
    1) Plug an rca cable into the first pre out that you want to modify.
    2) Closely observe each of the preout jacks and how they are soldered on the board. You will probably notice 4 solder joings holding the jack to the board.
    3) Take an ohmmeter and find out which pin is shorted to the center pin on the open end of the rca cable at the other end of the wire. That will be the pre out signal. Nothing needs to be done to that one. Make a note of which one it is.
    4) Use the ohmmeter to check which pins are the common (shield). Use the open end of the rca cable and put one end of the ohmmeter on the shield (outer ring) and check for the shorted point where the jack is soldered into the board. There may be 2 contact points on each jack for sheild. If there are, make a note of which pin(s) it/they are.
    5) The left over pin is the input to the amp. Mechanically, when an rca connector is plugged inot the jack, it lifts a blade and cuts the signal to the amp section. When it is unplugged, the blade contacts the pre out and passes the signal to the input of the receiver's amp section. To confirm that you have the correct pins for send and return, hold the ohmmeter across the 2 pins. They should be open when an rca connector is plugged in and shorted when it is pulled out. When you find those 2 pins, the fun begins.Get some shielded cable small enough to fit through the vent holes; you'll end up with 3 cables as a pigtail coming out of the top of your receiver. But the alternative is to drill holes to mount the return jacks to. You can decide what to do. Either way, you'll be fine.
    6) Take a piece of shielded cable, about 1 foot long and solder the center conductor to the pin that has been identified as the return (blade). I advise making the solder connections on the solder side of the board. Be very careful not to short to other things with the solder or soldered wire!! The smaller the center conuctor on the shielded cable the better.
    7) Solder the shield of the cable to the pin that you have identified as the common (Shield) on the jack.
    8) Feed the cable through on of the vent holes in the top of the receiver.
    9) Solder the center conductor on the other end to the center pin of an RCA female conector.
    10) Solder the shield to the rca female.

    You are now done with the first channel. Of course, you won't need to do this to the mains or center channel because I believe they already have a return loop.

    After you have completed, I would suggest testing them again before remounting the board in the receiver.

    Use the RCA cable and plug it in . Make sure the center pin (pre out) and the other pin (Pre in) open. Check to make sure the shield is not shorted to signal.

    The other nice thing about this mod is that when you don't have anything in the loop, the jacks will operate as normal. IOW, you don't have to have a jumper between the send and return to complete the signal path. Since you didn't mess with the previously mentioned mechanical operation, it still works. Only when you pulg something into one of the output jacks do you have to provide some signal back on the new return to get to the amp section.
     
  6. Adam Barratt

    Adam Barratt Cinematographer

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    I don't know of any DIY guides to adding DTS capability or analogue six-channel inputs (perhaps someone here can help), but companies such as MSB Technology are able to do both (MSB charge $385 for a DB-25 input modification and $595 to add DTS). However, considering the age of the receiver in question and the quality of its internal amplification (I once owned a 2092 myself), better results would be achieved by simply buying a completely new receiver/processor.
    Adam
     

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