Can someone explain how dramatic the difference is between 1080i and 1080p?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Scott_lb, Jan 1, 2006.

  1. Scott_lb

    Scott_lb Supporting Actor

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    I will be in the market for a new HD tv next month and will most likely purchase a 50" (or so) size DLP set. I've heard much about the new 1080p sets, however, I've not had the chance to compare 1080p and 1080i side by side. I am also aware that the price difference between the two types of sets can be pretty large. So, my question is, "Does the difference in picture quality between the two sets substantiate the difference in cost?" I'm looking to spend no more than $2,000 to $2,500.00. If the difference in picture quality is minimal (and yet noticable), I'd likely defer to 1080i. If the difference is pretty large, I'd hold off on my purchase until the price of 1080p sets drops lower to my idealized price range.

    Your thoughts are appreciated!
     
  2. Reginald Trent

    Reginald Trent Screenwriter

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    I have yet to see it, but I would suspect it to be similar to comparing 480I to 480P tho not quite as dramatic due to it being at the highest end of resolution.
     
  3. John S

    John S Producer

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    In digital displays, the comparison would be 720p and 1080p, there is no interlaced actual screen output with a digital display.


    1080p is still pretty new, I have not gotten to view one yet.

    I'd rate the difference between 720p and 1080i from a source perspective as minimal at best.

    The differences between a 720p digital display and a 1080i analog display are many, but the resolutions have little to do with it. There are pros and cons of digital displays -vs- analog displays, more like trade offs. Neither is really better overall even though people usually drastically prefer one over the other this is due to preference of which pros and cons matter most to them.
     
  4. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    as noted digital displays are progressive by nature. CRT displays can display interlaced images. The difference between display types is the biggest factor here...
     
  5. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    If this is too off topic I apologize.

    What is the frame rate for 1080p?

    I know that 720p goes up to 60fps, while most interlaced output is 29.97 or 30. So is 1080p 60fps or is it more or less?
     
  6. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    depends on the source and the display.
     
  7. Brian Osborne

    Brian Osborne Stunt Coordinator

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    I had the chance to view 1080P and 1080i/720P side by side in a local shop. IMO, good luck seeing the difference in resolution... I spent quite a bit of time looking at different video sources on both sets. The only thing I saw was the difference in contrast and black levels. I was looking at Samsung DLP, 6067 and the newer 6068?. You can save yourself a lot of bucks if you don't care too much about having the most up-to-date gadget on the market. View them side by side if you must, but on a big screen TV, sitting 8-14 feet away, you will have a hard time convincing me that you can see a better picture at 1080P than 720P. If it must be a set, find one with good contrast, good black levels, the size that you want, and in the price point you would like.
    With that budget you could possibly get a projector and all the extras. If you are going into a dedicated Home Theater room that is. If not, the RP DLP is the way to go.
     
  8. John S

    John S Producer

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    At typical viewing distances. I really can't tell 480p, 720p, or 1080i apart as far as the screen resolution goes.


    You get to decide what level and technology to buy. [​IMG]



    In that, I did just order a true 720p HD LCD Projector, so my choice is probably a better indicator of my own personal thoughts on this.
     
  9. Doug Otte

    Doug Otte Supporting Actor

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    I was under the impression that there's very little 1080p content yet, so to those of you who have compared: what 1080p source were they displaying in the store? There's nothing being broadcast at 1080p yet. I know some 1080p content is available as digital files, so it would have to be fed to the display from a computer.

    I read a review somewhere by a person who saw 1080p content at a Euro trade show and he was very impressed by it.

    Currently 720p is all you need, but if you think of a TV as a 10-year (or more) investment, by that time 1080p will probably be the standard. We'll probably buy an HD set this year, but I don't know yet if we'll spring the extra $s for 1080p or not.

    Doug
     
  10. John S

    John S Producer

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    Doug Otte, for now when we talk of 1080p -vs- 720p, we are really talking only of 1080p as a scaled to screen output resolution. I'd bank, DVD, 720p and 1080i sources all look better on them, so I would not count them out if price is not in the decision.
     
  11. Brian Osborne

    Brian Osborne Stunt Coordinator

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    I agree that the newer Samsung that I was veiwing did look a little better. But not because of the resolution. Moreso because the higher contrast ratios that are present in the newer models.
    In comparing the TVs, I looked at Broadcast HD (the best available resolution in my area), Digital Cable HD, DVD and a Computer, as I plan on having all in my Home Theater. Again, contrast ration was better, but resolution was really not noticable.
    Side note, I didn't do either. I went with 720P projector. When set up for testing, on 85" screen at 8 feet away, viewing images from my computer feed, I could not make out a even a single pixel. That being a still image. I feel like I made the right decision for my eye.
     
  12. Doug Otte

    Doug Otte Supporting Actor

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    Thanks, John S. That's what I suspected (what you saw was scaled to 1080p from a lower source). So, we don't really know how much better true 1080p content will look yet.

    I agree with you, 1080p is probably a better investment. In a coupla years when 1080p is standard, we'll appreciate having it.

    Doug
     
  13. Parker Clack

    Parker Clack Schizophrenic Man
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    Make sure that the RPTV can take a 1080p signal into it. There are several models out there that will go up to 1080p but will not take a 1080p signal at the input. So it should be able to handle a [email protected] over the HDMI on the set. Otherwise it will only go up to 1080i.

    Broadcasts are going to be staying at 1080i for several years and Blue-Ray and HD-DVD may get up to 1080p at some point.

    I know that HP has a new RPTV that will handle 1080p as well as the upper end Mits TVs. I am not sure about the other vendor's models.

    Parker
     
  14. MikeSh

    MikeSh Stunt Coordinator

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    The current Samsung 1080 models take a maximum of 1080i for input. They scale everything up to 1080p. Thats the biggest reason I'm holding off buying a new set, waiting for more sets with 1080p inputs.

    MikeS.
     
  15. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    The 1080i TV (most CRT HDTV's) obviously has more scan line visibility than the 1080p TV (all non-CRT 1080 models) but the quality of the electronics makes a difference too.

    While electronics exist today that make good 1080p out of 1080i, most HDTV's don't have that. In a few cases the vertical resolution of the 1080i subject matter on a 1080p TV is worse than on a 1080i (CRT) TV.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/hdtvnot.htm
     
  16. Mattias_ka

    Mattias_ka Supporting Actor

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    From a HD-DVD player, 1080i and 1080P, when done right, are no differnce in resolution quality.
     
  17. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    that is not the case, at the same refresh rate, 1080p will have twice as much resolution compared with 1080i. The visible difference won't be as extreme as that "twice" suggests, but depending on the capture, there can be interlaced artifacts if indeed captured interlaced rather than something like 1080psf, or interlaced from film content.
     

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