Can someone answer this NCAA basketball question?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brian Perry, Mar 22, 2002.

  1. Brian Perry

    Brian Perry Cinematographer

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    I thought that when a team commits its fifth foul of a half, the opponent shoots "one-and-one" free throws. This continues until the tenth foul, at which point the opponent shoots two foul shots.

    In the second half of tonight's Illinois/Kansas game, Frank Williams of Illinois was fouled while dribbling near the basket (non-shooting situation) at around 6:45, and this was Kansas' fifth team foul. However, Illinois didn't get to shoot free throws and had to take the ball out of bounds. And then a minute later, Williams was again fouled while dribbling near the basket (Kansas' sixth team foul), but yet again Illinois didn't shoot free throws. Finally, on Kansas' seventh team foul, Illinois got to the free throw line.

    Were these blunders by the referees or am I incorrect in thinking that Illinois was denied two chances at free throws?
     
  2. Calvin Cullen

    Calvin Cullen Stunt Coordinator

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    The seventh team foul of the half, not the fifth, is the "bonus" (one-and-one).
     
  3. Jon_B

    Jon_B Screenwriter

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    A tough loss. I honestly thought this was the year for Illinois. [​IMG]
    Jon
     
  4. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    I think you are confusing five personal fouls (disqualification of a player) with 7 team fouls (shooting the one and one bonus). BTW, at 10 team fouls the "one and one" becomes two free throws.
     
  5. Brian Perry

    Brian Perry Cinematographer

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    Thanks for the clarification -- I didn't know the bonus started at seven fouls. That means there are only three bonus situations? (7, 8, and 9 fouls.)
     
  6. Jon_Are

    Jon_Are Cinematographer

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    This has always confused me. What does 'one-and-one' mean?

    If anyone has a moment to spell out the basic rules of fouls and foul-shooting for me, I'd really appreciate it.

    Thanks,

    Jon
     
  7. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Studio Mogul

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    On the 7th, 8th, and 9th of a half, the other team is entitled to shoot a one-and-one. This means if the foul shot shooter makes the 1st free throw, he gets a chance to shoot another free throw. If he misses the 1st free throw, then the ball is in play and eligible to be rebounded by either team, the shooter gets no more free throws after the miss of the 1st free throw.

    On the 10th and subsequent fouls, the other team is awarded 2 free throws, so no matter if the 1st one is missed, a second free is forthcoming (if that one is missed, both teams are entitled to go for the rebound and the ball is in play if the free throw attempt at least hits the rim, otherwise, it's a dead ball and the other team gets to put the ball in play from the sideline under the basket). If the 2nd free throw is made, then the other team gets a change of possession and throws the ball in from the sideline of the basket.
     
  8. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    Patrick provides an excellent explanation. Think of "one and one" as "you shoot one, and if you make it you get another one."

    Until a few years ago, there was no 10 team foul rule. Every personal foul after 7 team fouls resulted in a "one and one" situation. College games were an even worse foul-fest in the last few minutes than they are now, as the trailing team fouled at every opportunity to (1) stop the clock, and (2) hope the first foul shot was missed. Teams could extend games and quite often come from behind due to their opponent's poor foul shooting (even more so than you see now).
     

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