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Can I use a Dayton HPSA-1000 subwoofer amp with my SpeakerCraft BassX-2 in-ceiling subwoofer? (1 Viewer)

WaltJohnson

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walter Johnson
Hello All,

Can I use a Dayton HPSA-1000 subwoofer amp with my SpeakerCraft BassX-2 in-ceiling subwoofer? Here’s my situation. I was able to purchase a brand new SpeakerCraft BassX-2 in-ceiling subwoofer (without the BB2502 amp) CHEAP ($99.). So I needed a subwoofer amp to push it. I just purchased the Dayton HPSA 1000-R subwoofer amplifier online and it arrived today (also pretty cheap - $275.). I made a mistake and didn’t realize the Dayton was a mono amp. The SpeakerCraft BassX-2 is a dual driver (opposed in the enclosure) that is spec’ed for the SpeakerCraft BB2502 amplifier (also a 1000 watt sub amp, but I cannot find any other specs for that amp or subwoofer and my requests to SpeakerCraft via email have fallen on deaf ears).
The Dayton HPSA 1000-R pushes 512 watts into 8 ohms and 1000 watts into 4 ohms. The SpeakerCraft BassX-2 subwoofer (in the box, unconnected) is reading 2.7 ohms at the terminal for each of the drivers. When I connect the drivers together to one speaker cable, they still read 2.7 ohms. Can I connect the leads from the two SpeakerCraft subwoofer drivers together and run them to the single mono output on the Dayton amp or will they detonate/damage each other? Please help! This was the last piece to the home theater and I am ready to install. Thanks, ------Walt
 

WaltJohnson

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walter Johnson
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: I have been advised that the SpeakerCraft BB2502 amplifier for the BassX-2 subwoofer has 4 outputs (two positive and two negative). The outputs are in parallel. The amplifier is rated at 300 watts/channel at 8 ohms and 500 watts/channel at 4 ohms.
 

Robert_J

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Wire your two drivers in series and connect them to the amp. The 2.7 ohm DC reading will be a 4 ohm nominal load. Wiring them in series will give you an 8 ohm load. That means your amp will push about 500w. Probably more than your drivers can take but you should be fine. That amp has a good SSF set at 18hz.

-Robert
 

Robert_J

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And you can use that amp when you want to upgrade to an infinite baffle sub (a real in-ceiling sub).
 

chuckg

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Apr 27, 2004
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By "series" Robert means:

hook the negative / black / - / minus wire from one coil to the negative / whatever terminal of the amp.
hook the positive / red / + / plus wire from that same coil to the negative / whatever of the second coil
hook the positive / red / + / plus wire from that second coil to the positive / whatever of the amp.

think of the coils as "chained" together. This adds the impedances, and should give a read of about 5.4, which will be 8 ohms nominal.


parallel would be where reds of both coils are hooked to red on the amp, and blacks similarly hooked together. This will give half the impedance (resistance) of a single coil alone, and probably be a bad thing.
 

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