Can I run my vcr and dvd through the same reciever

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by James_Bell, Feb 18, 2002.

  1. James_Bell

    James_Bell Auditioning

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    I have a Yamaha rx-3000. I was wondering if i could run the video for my vcr through it and the s-video from the dvd also then run the svideo to the tv with out needing another set of cables for video from the reciever. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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    Welcome to HTF!
    I'm not 100% sure what you have in mind, but it appears to be something likes this:
    VCR---------
    .............Receiver--------TV
    DVD Player--/
    Is that correct? With all the connections made by S-video cables? If so, it should work fine.
    I know you didn't ask, but here's a hint: It's a DVD player. A "DVD" is the shiny disc you insert into the player, but it doesn't have any S-video connections. [​IMG]
    M.
     
  3. David_Stein

    David_Stein Second Unit

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    wait, so right now you have the vcr running to the tv and the dvd player running to the tv with two svideo cables, right?

    and you want to be able to run it through the receiver without buying another cable?

    wouldnt that require some sort of wirless connection from the reciever to the tv? i dont think that exists. the amount of info that needs to be transfered per second is ah... really large (i can do it with computer monitors, but im just not sure with TVs....)
     
  4. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Generalizations:
    If the VCR or anything else is connected to the A/V receiver using a (composite) video cable, there must also be a composite video cable going to the TV.
    If the DVD player or anything else is connected to the receiver using S-video, there must also be an S-video cable going to the TV.
    But for better picture quality you continue to be better off avoiding composite from the DVD player.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
    There are a few exceptions, for example a very small number of A/V receivers, mostly high priced ones, will cross feed their composite inputs to their S-video output (quality probably less than composite material remaining composite going to a TV with 3D Y/C comb filter) and then only one, S-video, cable to TV is needed.
     
  5. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Hi James.

    They have already explained the problem, here are 2 solutions:

    A) Go to Radio Shack. They have a small $20 part that is a Composite to SVideo converter. Hook this to the output of your VCR then into the receiver. This makes the VCR look like a SVideo device. It's signal can now be seen on the SVideo output of the receiver.

    B) Run SVideo straight from the DVD player to the TV. Also, run Composite (single cable with RCA plugs) from the DVD player to the receiver, and VCR to the receiver. Now run a single Composite cable from the receiver to the TV.

    Now turn the TV to see the Composite video feed from the receiver. The system is now simple to operate. Both the DVD and VCR switching is controlled through the receiver. This works well for the Wife & Kids.

    But when YOU sit down to watch a DVD, take the extra step and flip to the direct SVideo connection. You can also have fun flipping between Composite and SVideo and note the improved picture. (Mine is set up this way and I use it to demo the improvements SVideo gives you).

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. Bill Catherall

    Bill Catherall Screenwriter

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    Bob -

    You seem to often recommend the composite to S-video adapter. I'm wondering how it looks compared to just a regular composite connection and what the advantage to using it is. If the picture improves than I can see an advantage. If not, you're spending $20 (plus an additional cable) and not gaining any ground. I really don't see an improvement in ease-of-use, but if you get better quality then it's money well spent. But I don't quite understand how a $20 adapter could possibly give you a better picture than a good 3D comb filter (pretty standard on most TVs).

    So please post your review of the quality difference between a straight through composite connection vs. composite-to-S-video adapter. I'm really curious.
     
  7. MikePon

    MikePon Extra

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    I purchased one of these Composite to S-Video adapters. My thought was to improve ease-of-use switching inputs on the TV. The adapter looked very well made and I had high hopes. Those hopes came crashing down when I looked at the effects this adapter had on the picture quality. I saw a significant degradation of the composite video signal from my VCR after converting to S-Video and using the S-Video in on my TV.

    Just for what it's worth.
     
  8. Bob McElfresh

    Bob McElfresh Producer

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    Bill. I am NOT a fan of the cheap Composite to SVideo converter. You will NEVER hear me claim that it looks good. (Yes, I know what a Comb filter is for, but this is the "Basics" area).

    I only recommend it to people for low-grade sources (like a VCR) and to simplify the use of the HT system.

    I actually prefer my second option: running Composite for everything through the receiver.
     
  9. Bill Catherall

    Bill Catherall Screenwriter

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    Thanks for the reply Bob. You too Mike. [​IMG] You basically confirmed what I thought (based on theory only, not testing) about those adapters. Yes, I like your second solution better too.
    Although this is the basics area, I don't think it's wise to recommend solutions that actually degrade the video quality when there's another solution available. At least not without letting them know what they'll be getting into. "Basics" doesn't have to mean "child's play." [​IMG]
    Personally, I think the best (and only) use for those adapters is when your video monitor only has an S-video input and your video source only has a composite output. Other than that, I'm sure even the worst comb filter can do a better job than that adapter. And again, I don't think I'll ever see a situation in which it will actually improve ease of use.
    Sorry to make such a big issue about this, but I think it's important. I see it come up quite a bit here and thought it would be good to bring the issue to light.
     
  10. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    One irritating problem still found on a few TV sets is that they don't work if both their composite and S-video jacks have something in them. That will force some folks to either use composite for everything or get a composite to S-video adapter.

    Composite to S-video adapters that don't noticeably degrade the picture cost more than USD 250. new. You may be able to find a used Faroudja VP100 or Camelot Crystal Vision VPS1 adapter for less in E-Bay. Although these models don't best a good 3D Y/C comb filter, they come very close.

    Cheaper adapters might not make VCR tapes look worse but when you tune in a TV show using the VCR, the degradation (compared with composite direct to the TV) will be noticeable.
     

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