Can I run component and composite wires from receiver to tv?

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Rob White, Feb 18, 2006.

  1. Rob White

    Rob White Stunt Coordinator

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    Hey,

    I had no problems setting up my Onkyo receiver with my HD-cable box and my Xbox 360 with component cables. Also had no problems running component cables to my HDTV. Using video switching through the receiver has been great.

    But..... now I'm trying to hook up a VCR (old model). I've tried running composite cables from VCR to receiver, but it's not working. I get sound over the speakers but no video on the tv. I think the problem is that the receiver can't send translate from the composite that comes in to the component that goes out. So I used an extra composte cable just for the video from receiver to tv. But that doesn't seem to work either.

    Any thoughts?

    Also, for now I'm just worried about playing VCR tapes (no recording). If I can solve the "play" issue, then I'll worry about the "taping" issue.

    Thanks in advance,
    Rob
     
  2. John_RO

    John_RO Stunt Coordinator

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    If I understand you correctly, you are running component video cables to your tv via your reciever. I don't think you can run composite (coax) through a reciever. You can, however run RCA cables (red, white, and yellow) through a reciever but the problem is that you are outputting component video to the TV. You probably need to use a different input on your TV for your VCR hooked up with standard RCA. You can always run the audio through the reciever. Personally, for VHS, I just run the RCA's directly to my TV.
     
  3. Rob White

    Rob White Stunt Coordinator

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    When I was writing "composite" I meant regular RCA cables.

    So it sounds like I should connect this way:
    •audio from VCR to receiver via red/white RCA's
    •video from VCR to tv via yellow RCA

    I'll give that a shot.

    Rob
     
  4. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Supporting Actor

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    You would need a receiver that converts all inputs to component output. There are some, I believe, but they will be costly.

    Running composite (yellow) from the VCR to the receiver and composite from receiver to the TV should work. You did remember to switch the TV to the input that has the composite cable to it? You might need to go through setup on the receiver again. With the typical jack layout you will have to be carefull to get all of the "ins" and "outs" connected correctly. VCR "out" to receiver video "in" and receiver composite monitor "out" (not generally video out) to TV video "in" (must be different from component "in" designation - for example, component to video 4 and composite to video 2 on the TV). You might be able to connect the VCR to receiver video 1 "in" and the TV from receiver video 2 "out" if the receiver has an odd priority switching method.

    There is another problem you will encounter eventually. Your HD box will output component or composite (s-video too?) but not both simultaneously (at least that is usually the case) causing you to not watch HD while recording SD without a conversion of some sort and I don't know of any receivers that will convert component to composite, just the other way. Your TV will not take component "in" and convert it for the "monitor out" jacks that many TVs have either.

    There is another quirk you may be able to exploit. Some devices allow the connection of a composite (yellow) cable to the green jack of a component input. (look closely at the markings on the TV's jacks for something like a component/composite or component/Y designation). The receiver is perfectly capable of passing composite on the green jacks and some TVs will autodetect that composite video is being sent to the component jacks. You won't do any damage, the worst that will happen is that the VCR playback will be in black and white (no chroma).
     
  5. Mark Cappelletty

    Mark Cappelletty Cinematographer

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    Rob,

    Which receiver are we talking about? I'm looking at the Onkyo 703 ($600) and the H/K 340 ($525), both of which are supposed to convert all signals (composite/component) to component video to the TV. I don't tape much anymore, but I'm sure there are some SD recordings I'm going to eventually want to dub via my VCR.
     

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