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Can I measure the Vrms on different outputs, mainly the Sub out? (1 Viewer)

hellspawn69

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My Crown XLS1000 has a sensitivity of 1.4Vrms

http://rdn.harmanpro.com/product_documents/documents/2563_1431033281/XLS_Install_DataSheet_Web_050615_original.pdf


I'm wiring a Rockustics BP Sub Jr into my outdoor setup.

http://www.rockustics.com/products/subwoofer-series/bp-sub-jr/
It has (2) 4ohm 10" speakers. So I am planning on wiring each 10" driver to a channel on the amp.


I am pushing audio to my Crown XLS1000 via my Sony DA4600ES, currently planning on just using the SUB OUT on the receiver, and doing a Y-Splitter of the RCA cable so it can go to my Indoor and my Outdoor Sub. I already have the 2 channels I have for the SPEAKER B outputs on the DA4600ES going outside to my existing outdoor speakers, but I have verified the SUB OUT has signal flowing through it on SPEAKER A or SPEAKER B setting.


My question is, how can I verify my receiver is putting out 1.4Vrms? My (very limited) understanding is, I need that level (or higher, or is it bad to go higher?) going into the Crown XLS1000 in order to achieve it's maximum power.

I have a multimeter (although I'm a noob with it), if that can be used to take measurements.


Thanks!
 

Al.Anderson

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This was a new one for me, I never thought to worry about amp input sensitivity. It looks like the the Sony is putting out 2V, which would be 1.4V rms assuming a sine wave (according to this Wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root_mean_square)


So it seems the output and input approximately match (I say approx, because I doubt the true signal is a pure sine wave.)


My take on what would happen if the input voltage were higher is that you'd just be at max volume sooner, so your amp would always be seeing max volume (which you could turn down via the volume, but the transition from min to max would always be very abrupt).
 

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

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My understanding is that it takes a professional-grade meter to accurately measure Vrms. If you can live with “reasonably accurate,” you can find a method for measuring an AVR’s output signal voltage, using a digital volt meter and sine wave signals, in Part 7 of my gain structure article. You can find a link to it in my signature.


Regards,

Wayne A. Pflughaupt

 

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