Can I calibrate my new hs500 or Tosh 36hf72 imediately with avia or wait?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Todd smith, Feb 28, 2003.

  1. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

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    Can I callibrate my new hs500 or 36hf72 immediately after I get it with avia or do I need to wait for some reason? If I have to wait how long should I do this?
     
  2. Alan Pummill

    Alan Pummill Screenwriter

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    Most ISF calibrators tell you to wait until you have at least 100 hours on the set before ISF calibrating it.

    I would imagine this would hold true for Avia as well.
     
  3. Rick J

    Rick J Stunt Coordinator

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    todd

    i agree with alan.

    i would just add two things: that initially you turn the picture settings down to ~50% and the sharpness to ~25%, and also that you don't leave the set on for 100 straight hours. some people have asked about that in the past and it's not recommended...otherwise start enjoying! rick
     
  4. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

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    We need to look at a couple of things on this issue:

    1) The difference between AVIA calibration and ISF calibration.

    AVIA calibration is done with the user controls only, can easily be redone at any time, and doesn't involve any permanent changes in the less-accessible service menu involving items that are not easily understood by the set owner.
    While some aspects of a set's performance will change as a set breaks in, redoing AVIA to compensate during this period is at most a 20 minute project.

    ISF calibration involves adjustments to gray scale, geometry, and other service menu parameters that are beyond the ability of the typical set owner, and therefore is not easily repeated as a set breaks in. For this reason ISF calibration should be delayed until the set is broken in.

    So while it's wise not to get the ISF done until the set's "settled" there is no reason at all not to do AVIA right away since you can redo it at any time.
    You should wait until the set's been on for an hour or so before doing it so it's fully warmed up.

    Doing AVIA right away will immediately get rid of the harmful default "torch" settings done at the factory.

    I see no reason whatsoever to deny ones' self the benefits of AVIA calibration until the set's "broken in".

    2) We are talking about direct view sets here, not rptvs. There are far fewer issues involved in the break in process on a direct view.

    I've calibrated 3 rptvs and a direct view with AVIA or it's predecessor Video Essentials, all on the day I got them after running them for an hour. I have repeated the calibration every week or so for the first couple of months, and things have changed over that time to varying degrees.

    So while I'll subscribe to the idea that ISF should be delayed until the set stabilizes, I must repeat that AVIA adjustment is easy enough to redo that there's no reason not to do it on the day you get your set.

    Think of ISF adjustement as "cast in stone" (and expensive) and AVIA as easily changed (and cheap), and you get the gist of my position on this issue.
     
  5. Todd smith

    Todd smith Supporting Actor

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    Great, Thanks for all the info!
     
  6. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Do it right away, then again after 100 hours, and maybe a few times in between. Only thing it will do is help. By not doing the Avia calibration you subject yourself to possibly overdriving the display.
     

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