Can Avia hurt my speakers?

Discussion in 'Speakers & Subwoofers' started by Dave H, Jan 11, 2004.

  1. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    I was using Avia to check some brightness and sharpness tonight. Now, I still had my receiver on from the previous movie I was watching and the volume was somewhat high. On any rate, as the video test pattern on Avia switched to the next pattern I heard this "oooomp" noise - a result of changing from one pattern to the other. It didn't sound very good at all. Can this damage my speakers? You would think Avia would have made the video pattern screen change to be silent.
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Yes it can. Low frequencies are usually not a problem, depending on your setup, but a quick burst of highs can quickly damage your tweeters.
     
  3. Dave H

    Dave H Producer

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    John,

    Is there any test or something I can do to see if damage has occured? I listed to a soundtrack afterward and everything sounded ok....but I would like to know for sure.
     
  4. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    If everything sounds fine, you probably have nothing to worry about. place your hand between the tweeter and you, and inch or two away from it (each speaker). If you hear them become muffled, then they are fine. If you hear no difference when you do this, there is damage.
     
  5. Ronneil Camara

    Ronneil Camara Stunt Coordinator

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    I am also planning to buy Avia. I would like to get some tips from you folks before starting the calibration. Such as (1) what db should the receiver be set at? (2) radio shack's spl - what should be the setting and so on and so forth. I don't have this tools right now so I feel like I am in a room with no light at all trying to find the way out.

    btw, which is better, avia or sound and vision? Are there any other?

    Any advice is highly appreciated.

    Thanks.

    neil
     
  6. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    Ronneil.

    Avia gives specific directions on how to use the SPL meter, but I'll outline it. If you want to calibrate for reference level = 00dB, set your receiver volume to 00dB. Set your SPL meter to 'C' weighting, slow and 80dB. Place the meter at the listening position (sweet spot), ear level, tilted 45 degrees forward. Adjust all speaker levels so the Avia tones play at 85dB on the meter. You may want to adjust the sub to 2-3 dB hot. After this calibration, "reference level" is at 00dB on your system. So if you play at -10dB, you are at "10 below reference".
     
  7. Lee Bailey

    Lee Bailey Second Unit

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    Whoa! Without knowing what type of receiver a person has, do not have them adjust it to 00db before starting the test. That could blow out their speakers. Safer to just start with the volume level down, start the left front speaker test, and bring the main volume up to the 'reference level'. Make sure the left and right fronts are adjusted to the same level(you may have to use the balance control for this). From here on, do not adjust the master volume control while you are adjusting the rest of the speakers. When the test is playing on the center, rears, and sub, use the receiver's volume control for the respective speaker, and adjust the volume to match what the front speakers were measured at. On the sub, you should probably have the sub's amp set at the halfway point. Try to keep the receiver's sub-out slightly below it's halfway point, to keep down distortion on the signal being fed to the sub. Adjust the sub's volume control to either match your reference, or like some prefer, 2 to 3 db higher than the reference.
     
  8. Ronneil Camara

    Ronneil Camara Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the warning. Coz right now, setting the volume to -14db is already loud when I am watching movies. Is master volume different from reference level?

    I'm new to hts. [​IMG]

    Btw, there's one weird thing in my Yamaha RXV-1400 receiver though or probably, I am doing the wrong procedure. I was playing it the other night and trying to change the db level of left and front speaker. I can manually change the level of the left speaker but not the right. I will test it again tonight.

    Thanks again.

    Ronneil
     
  9. Lee Bailey

    Lee Bailey Second Unit

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    In that case, use the right speaker as the reference first, then adjust the left manually to match the right.

    As far as master vs reference: Master volume is your volume control for the system. Reference level is the setting on the master volume control that you found creates the correct dB reading for reference on your system. Some systems let you match that level as 0dB on your control. It varies. I for one only calibrate to 75dB using Avia, which on my volume control is -36dB, not 0db. What you're hoping for is having all the channels keep at the same volume no matter what your volume control is set to. But, you would have to verify that with a meter, since your ears are not sensitive enough for a 1 or 2dB change in volume.
     
  10. Roger Q

    Roger Q Stunt Coordinator

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    I've got a 2400 and I imagine that their calibration capabilities are similar. If so, you should be able to adjust each speaker individually.
     

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