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Calling all Scuzzi experts..

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brett DiMichele, Mar 7, 2002.

  1. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Hey Gang,

    Let me start by saying I am a "ScuzzIdiot" and I know nothing

    about Scuzzi.

    Okay work was pitching a bunch of parts to make room for new

    stuff so I got my pick of "junk". I have a box full of

    hot swappable Scuzzi hard disks (Quantum,Segate,IBM Etc.)

    All are 2.0 to 2.2GB each. I have like 15 or so drives!

    What can I do with these bad boys? What are my options?
     
  2. Matt Stryker

    Matt Stryker Screenwriter

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    What kind of connectors do they have on the backs? If they are specifically designed to connect to a backplane of a specific server, they're probably pretty worthless.

    You might try Ebay; there is a whole legion of people on there that pay good money for proprietary parts for older computers, especially servers. I'm not trying to thread crap, but the amount of work you would have to put in to get those drives working could be fairly tremendous.
     
  3. Larry Seno Jr.

    Larry Seno Jr. Supporting Actor

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    You could pick up a hot swap rack and create a RAID array!
    Check out this place:
    www.rackmountpro.com
    (MAD nerdy stuff, and you will need to program that RAID ARRAY software)
     
  4. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    These drives are basically paperweights in the days of cheap high capacity IDE hard drives. And you do know it's "SCSI" right?
     
  5. Colin Dunn

    Colin Dunn Supporting Actor

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    A lot of hot-swappable SCSI hard disks are just regular SCSI hard disks in a special enclosure. If you can take the drive out of the hot-swap tray, you can then use it as an internal SCSI hard disk.

    Most of the time, it will be a 50-pin male ribbon connector (ribbon shape), or a 68-pin female connector (trapezoidal shape). Currently, the 68-pin is more common, especially for servers/RAID.

    As Patrick implied, I'm not sure it's worth the effort to get those into an array. A good array controller will cost several hundred $$$, and you use up a lot of power spinning 15 drives. But you can get an IDE RAID controller for
     
  6. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Patrick,

    Yes I know that is it SCSI (Scuzzi)!

    Yeah you are right IDE drives are affordable. Less than $200.00 for

    A high quality 60-80 Gig IDE Drive these days. The point is that I

    Just got 15 2+ Gig SCSI Drives for free. Are they paperweights?

    I hardly believe a 2 Gig anything is a paperweight. Even if you manually

    Switched back and fourth between drives these would make perfect dump

    Disks for various files. Just dump what you want and then store them some

    Place safe for future reference. I wouldn’t call that a paperweight.

    As for the drives they appear to be standard SCSI Ports and standard power

    Connectors. The drives are easily removable from the hot swap chassis and

    They look like normal consumer drives when removed. I will try and provide

    A picture showing the rear of the drive.

    So how could I implement these drives? What would it cost to purchase a SCSI

    RAID controller and how many of these drives can I use? Could I use them all?

    Thanks in advance for the help and tips.

    Or if I decided to sell these on Ebay what would be a very

    fair asking price? $10.00 each?
     
  7. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    I would think the first thing you need to do is to ascertain the exact SCSI spec the drives use as this will affect what controller you buy.
     
  8. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Well I got some other stuff....

    Found a brand new Cisco 4 Port Ethernet in the box.. Gave

    that to a Co Worker (He will get use out of it)

    and I found some other contraption that I have no clue what

    it is.. Whatever it is it has a Pentium Socket7 CPU and 2

    diffrent types of RAM.

    I took the CPU and the ram out. The one Ram stick is a DIMM

    and it has 9 ram chips per side 512 Meg?

    I also need to know if there is a web site or something

    where I can verify what speed this Pentium CPU is.. I see

    numbers on the chip and on the core of the CPU but I see

    nothing that designates speed so I need some sort of site

    that has model numbers.
     
  9. Carlo Medina

    Carlo Medina Executive Producer

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    With the performance of today's IDE drives, coupled with the age of those 1-2GB SCSIs, I'm not sure what you can do with them. RAID is an option, but that wouldn't be very much space that you're RAIDING (since it uses them in redundant fashion and doesn't add the total space). Daisy chaining them, I'm not sure you'd want to (or even if you could) go that route, too much hassle for not enough payback.
    If you're a real techie guy you could use them as paperweights. [​IMG]
     
  10. Chris

    Chris Lead Actor

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    They are paperweights. Even in a raid array, the performance of older 2.2G drives will be poor; because your top burst rate is very low (even if wide, which I'd doubt, you'd be talking 20G; at UW 40.. and I really doubt you'll find any UW 2.2G drives..)

    In other words: it'll suck because the maximum bandwidth provided will be poor and the drive performance will be poor.

    Flog them on Ebay or something.
     
  11. Roy C.

    Roy C. Second Unit

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    Brett,

    I, just like you, am a proponent of using old stuff regardless of how slow or how small it is. There is always use for some older equipment. Now, if you could get your hands on a RAID5 controller (funny, I have one sitting at home), a long cable and possibly some adapters(50-pin to 68-pin), you should be able to put some if not most of the drives on it. Some new controllers will support up to 15 devices. That will give you a good size drive (approx. 28GB) to put all your stuff in or to play with. Granted not very fast but usable.

    I have a PC that I setup with leftover stuff from the office and let me tell you, it is a solid PC. I have 2-10k RPM 9.1GB and 2-4.3GB drives, a SCSI Yamaha burner, a DDS-3 12/24GB tape drive (I also have a spare for sale) and an older SCSI DVD ROM. I can pretty much play Quake on it while I'm burning a CD. It does have a solid CPU and enough RAM plus good ventilation. This is a must have for SCSI drives since they generate a lot of heat.

    By the way, your drives (bare) should have SCSI-2 50-pin connectors. I think that equated to 20MB/S transfer rates and possibly more depending on the controller.

    Good luck,

    Roy C.
     
  12. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Roy,

    They are all SCSI-2 Connectors and each drive can be removed

    from the hot swap cage and used as a regular consumer style

    Internal SCSI HDD.

    I still think I am just going to sell them on Ebay cheap and

    buy another large IDE. I have 2 smaller IDE drives that I

    may also sell cheap and just run 2 massive ATA-100 IDE's.

    It would just be simpler for now.
     
  13. Darren Lewis

    Darren Lewis Supporting Actor

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    If you want to keep the SCSI drives, you'll have to pick up a SCSI contoller from ebay or somewhere. The cost of this alone would probably get you a 20-40Gb IDE drive.

    I'm not sure that massive drives are such a good thing - more data lost if the drive fails. Are two 40Gb drives better than one 80Gb drive (if you have the space of course)?
     
  14. Brett DiMichele

    Brett DiMichele Producer

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    Darren,
    Nah, Data Loss to me is a small point. Anything I intend to
    keep I can backup to a small IDE Drive and stuff away in the
    closet. The only thing I really back up are MP3's and my art
    work.
    I would like to get an 80Gig to go along with my 60.
    Not like I "need" it.. This is a person who got by with a
    total of 2.6 Gig on his last machine for 7 years.. [​IMG]
     

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