calibrated my TV but not happy with results

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Keith_R, Jul 8, 2005.

  1. Keith_R

    Keith_R Screenwriter

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    Hey all, I recently used Avia to calibrate my 7+ year old Sony tube tv and I came out with mixed results. I just did the basic calibration of pic settings in the user-level menu, nothing out of the service menu.

    I had originally calibrated this television using the THX optimizer on one of my discs and like an idiot accidently reset it back to factory default which is torch mode with contrast at max. IIRC the THX optimization gave me different results that IMO looked better.

    The problem I have with this post-Avia calibration is that it just seems really dark, and it really seems as if my set is accenting red more. Post-Avia, my contrast is down about halfway from max, and my brightness is almost near minimum. The red push problem I was having was corrected by pumping down my color a bit from what Avia told me to do. After turning down my color from the Avia results people didn't seem red and sunburned. I calibrated this Tv twice and came out with relatively the same results.

    now this Tv is nothing special, it is merely a 20 inchish, analog,entry-level Sony that doesn't even have S-Video, it doesn't have video preset settings so I had to just do a straight calibration using the default factory settings. I did all of this off of my DVD player connected through composite. I'm watching standard cable television off of it and some DVD's.

    For comparison, I calibrated my newer Toshiba tube television using Avia and the pic comes out looking much brighter than the Sony does.

    Is what I'm experiencing normal or is it bad calibration on my part?


    Thanks!
     
  2. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    AVIA does not teach you how to adjust proper contrast per se ... it teaches you where "not to set contrast."

    It identifies the proverbial red line on your contrast control. Proper contrast is determined with a light meter and the 100% windowbox putting out about 30 ft-l of light. Without the light meter, you should pick a point where the same 100% pattern does not hurt your eyes.

    Good power supply and bad power supply will affect the results of the calibration of these two parameters.

    Regards
     
  3. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    Actually, a well calibrated set usually looks dark to most people, mostly because of how artifically bright the factory settings are. One option is to watch it that way for a few days and see if you can (or want to) adjust to it.

    But on the other hand, I always pump up the contrast (or brightness?) slightly after I calibrate with Avia, because I use my set for DVD watching with the lights dim as well as for day-time viewing. So I basically have found a compromise setting where I'm happy with both pictures.

    You could also go rent one of the many THX optimizer DVDs, and see what you get that way. [​IMG] I *do* remember that some of the early ones had some issues with how the test patterns were setup though.
     
  4. Massimo N

    Massimo N Stunt Coordinator

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    The basic calibration will cause other flaws in the display devise to shop up more. For example, the red push "accenting more red" is caused by the colour decoder in the Sony.

    I have found with the brightness setting that if your set does not have good shadow detail, to set the brightness not on the Black test pattern, but with the 50% or 100% half white pattern.

    Each input should be calibrated independently. If you're using the Coax for cable, using the setting you made with your DVD player is a good starting ground, but will require some additional adjustments for each input.
     

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